Special Coverage

Home

Coming Soon - Heat Transfer Simulation in Materials Processing

Engineers in the aerospace, defense, heavy manufacturing, automotive, and medical product industries develop processes to produce materials with specific mechanical and physical properties. In this webinar, we will demonstrate the analysis of conjugate heat transfer problems in COMSOL Multiphysics that are relevant to material processing, and investigate the effects of fluid flow on the quenching of hot components. The analyses show the effects of conduction, convection and radiation for sufficiently high processing temperatures. The webinar will conclude with a Q&A session.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

Read More >>

Coming Soon - Novel Wiring Technologies for High-Performance Applications

Because wire failure in aerospace vehicles could be catastrophic, smart wiring capabilities have been critical for NASA. Through the years, researchers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have developed technologies, expertise, and research facilities to meet this need.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

Read More >>

In The Near Future, Will 3D Printers Be Used To Create Human Organs?

3D printers, an emerging technology, use computer-created digital models to produce a variety of objects, including toys, mechanical components, and even food. There is hope now, too, that 3D printers could someday create much-needed organs for transplants. Printing human organs is still years away, but many medical professionals are optimistic and see great promise with the technology. A major challenge will be the ability to create the material, which is biological in nature.

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Coming Soon - How Leading Aerospace Enterprises Use and Manage Materials Data

Join speakers from Lockheed Martin, Honeywell, and NASA as they share how they have implemented effective workflows for the management and use of critical data on composites, alloys, and other materials. They will discuss the impact on materials engineering, design, simulation, and on making better materials decisions. Combining the right materials data with the right tools, such enterprises can reduce cost and turnaround time in solving materials-related problems.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

Read More >>

Remote Sensing Moisture Model Could Aid Farmers

Global farmers could get better decision-making help as refinements are made to North Alabama soil moisture modeling research being done by an atmospheric science doctoral student at The University of Alabama in Huntsville. The models indicate how much added moisture would be needed in a given area versus historical data to achieve various crop yields, and they could aid in making expensive infrastructure investments by helping to determine their economic viability.

Posted in: Sensors, Software, Mathematical/Scientific Software, RF & Microwave Electronics, News

Read More >>

NASA Radar Demonstrates Ability to Predict Sinkholes

New analyses of NASA airborne radar data collected in 2012 reveal that radar detected indications of a huge sinkhole before it collapsed and forced evacuations in Louisiana that year. The findings suggest such radar data, if collected routinely from airborne systems or satellites, could at least in some cases foresee sinkholes before they happen, decreasing danger to people and property.

Posted in: Environmental Monitoring, Green Design & Manufacturing, Sensors, Test & Measurement, Monitoring, Aerospace, RF & Microwave Electronics, News

Read More >>

NASA Model Provides 3-D View of L.A. Earthquake

On March 28, residents of Greater Los Angeles experienced the largest earthquake to strike the region since 2008. The magnitude 5.1 quake was centered near La Habra in northwestern Orange County about 21 miles (33 kilometers) east-southeast of Los Angeles, and was widely felt throughout Southern California. There have been hundreds of aftershocks, including one of magnitude 4.1.Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., have developed a model of the earthquake, based on the distribution of aftershocks and other seismic information from the U.S. Geological Survey.A new image based on the model shows what the earthquake may look like through the eyes of an interferometric synthetic aperture radar, such as NASA's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). JPL scientists plan to acquire UAVSAR data from the region of the March 28 quake, possibly as soon as this week, and process the data to validate and improve the results of their model. The UAVSAR flights serve as a baseline for pre-earthquake activity. As earthquakes occur during the course of this project, the team is measuring the deformation at the time of the earthquakes to determine the distribution of slip on the faults, and then monitoring longer-term motions after the earthquakes to learn more about fault zone properties. SourceAlso: Learn about QuakeSim 2.0.

Posted in: Imaging, Software, Mathematical/Scientific Software, Test & Measurement, Monitoring, RF & Microwave Electronics, News

Read More >>

White Papers

Smallest Aec-q200 Compliant Rf Filters Enable Surfin’ on the Highway!
Sponsored by Crystal Instruments
Changing Face of Robotics
Sponsored by Maplesoft
Oscilloscope Fundamentals
Sponsored by Rohde and Schwarz A and D
Multi-Purpose Non-Contact Position/Displacement Sensing
Sponsored by Kaman
An Improved Method for Differential Conductance Measurements
Sponsored by Keithley Instruments
6 Ways Software Rendering Boosts Embedded System Graphics
Sponsored by ENSCO Avionics

White Papers Sponsored By: