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Could tear-off screens catch on?

This week's Question: While LG and Samsung have worked to develop screens that roll and bend, a new patent from Google describes a screen that can be torn like a piece of paper. Images in the filing show an advertisement with coupons that can be pulled off and used in-store, as well as a drawing of a robot that has been ripped in half. Additionally, the detached portions are shown being reattached. Disposable displays will likely not emerge as a viable technology until manufacturing costs drop significantly. Engineers, however, have also been working on ways to make digital pixels appear on regular paper. What do you think? Could tear-off screens catch on? 

Posted in: Question of the Week

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4 Steps In Selecting Fluid Connectors For Medical Device And Equipment Applications

With so many risks and options for connecting tubing in medical applications, it is important to have a simple and repeatable strategy for selecting the best connector solution. The process requires a thorough analysis of the application in order to ensure connectors will be compatible with the physical, chemical and biological environment, and be easy to use and help prevent misconnections—whether the application involves connecting air lines for a blood pressure cuff, connecting reagent supplies to a blood analyzer or making critical connections between a patient and heart-lung machine.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers

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3D Imaging Reveals Battery Degradation in Real Time

Using sophisticated 3D imaging, a team at University College London, The European Synchrotron (ESRF), University of Manchester, Harwell Oxford, Oregon State University, and the National Physical Laboratory visualized a battery’s performance loss and internal structural damage. The images of active commercial Li/MnO2 disposable batteries, captured using X-ray computed tomography, will help to improve cell designs.

Posted in: Articles, Features, Photonics

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Filtering in Machine Vision

There are many different types of filters in machine vision that can be utilized to improve or change the image of the object under inspection. It is important to understand the different technologies behind the various types of filters in order to understand their advantages and limitations. Although there is a wide variety of filters, almost all can be divided into two primary categories: colored glass filters and coated filters.

Posted in: Articles, Features, Photonics

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Customized Drone Maps Glacier Growth

Using a custom-designed drone, a researcher from The Ohio State University mapped glaciers and wetlands in Peru’s Cordillera Blanca mountain range. Despite a discovered drop in glacier growth, the findings from the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) revealed a slightly more optimistic picture of the region’s water supply, which relies in part on the ice formations.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Applications, Photonics

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V-FASTR Radio Transient Classifier

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California The V-FASTR (VLBA Fast Transient Experiment) system was motivated by the desire to monitor the radio sky for interesting transient events. To be confident that no interesting extragalactic event is missed, every VFASTR candidate requires human review and evaluation. Candidates consist of pulsar pulses, spurious correlated radio frequency interference (RFI), and other potentially unknown phenomena. However, the number of candidates generated by V-FASTR each day ranges from zero, to tens, to hundreds, to thousands, depending on the observational target and environmental conditions. On busy days, the volume of candidates exceeds the amount of time available for human review.

Posted in: Briefs

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Wideband, Dual-Polarized, Ultra-Low-Noise Focal Plane Array Feed for Active/Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland NASA missions utilize active, passive, or both, microwave sounders with a large reflector antenna as an important component. In most of these applications, design engineers have realized that desirable science requirements (spatial and temporal resolutions) can be met only by compromising between conflicting engineering design parameters. A microwave remote sensor designed to achieve high spatial resolution would result in longer revisit time, yielding low temporal resolution and vice-versa. To overcome these conflicting requirements, the present technology advocates use of a cluster of feed horns arranged in the focal plane of the primary reflector antenna. Each feed horn produces a different footprint with appropriate overlaps covering a wide swath, allowing a high temporal resolution. Each feed horn, since they act independently, is designed to produce high spatial resolution. However, this approach has many disadvantages compared to an antenna system in which the cluster of horn feeds is made to act as a Focal Plane Array (FPA). Furthermore, the current approach does not enable maximization of the antenna gain, or immunity for radio frequency interference (RFI).

Posted in: Briefs

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