News

Wall-Climbing Drone Flies and Sticks to Target

Researchers have developed the CAROS (Climbing Aerial RObot System) wall-climbing robot with higher mobility than existing wall-climbing robots because it can fly. It also can restore its pose after an accidental fall due to an unexpected disturbance. Since the robot can stick to the surface, it can perform close inspection and maintenance of the structure.

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Graphene-Based Device Improves Water Filtering

According to the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report, lack of access to safe, clean water is the biggest risk to society over the coming decade. A new graphene-based filter built by Monash University and the University of Kentucky allows water and other liquids to be filtered nine times faster than leading commercial devices.

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Algorithm Makes Hyperspectral Imaging Faster

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Delaware have developed an algorithm that can quickly and accurately reconstruct hyperspectral images using less data. The images are created using instruments that capture hyperspectral information succinctly, and the combination of algorithm and hardware makes it possible to acquire hyperspectral images in less time and to store those images using less memory.

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Electron-Beam Imaging Can See Elements ‘Invisible’ to Common Methods

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a new imaging technique, tested on samples of nanoscale gold and carbon, that greatly improves images of light elements using fewer electrons. The newly demonstrated technique, dubbed MIDI-STEM, for matched illumination and detector interferometry STEM, combines STEM with an optical device called a phase plate that modifies the alternating peak-to-trough, wave-like properties (called the phase) of the electron beam.

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Combining Imaging Technologies Better Identifies Coronary Plaque

Combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) with near-infrared autofluorescence (NIRAF) imaging may more accurately identify coronary artery plaques that are most likely to rupture and cause a heart attack. OCT provides images of tissue microstructure but not of its chemical and molecular composition. Since both of those characteristics are needed to fully understand coronary artery disease, the combination of OCT with NIRAF could provide a more powerful tool for investigating coronary pathology.

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World's Thinnest Lens May Revolutionize Cameras

Scientists at the Australian National University (ANU) have created the world's thinnest lens, one two-thousandth the thickness of a human hair, opening the door to flexible computer displays and a revolution in miniature cameras. The discovery hinged on the remarkable potential of the molybdenum disulphide crystal, which is a perfect candidate for future flexible displays. It survives at high temperatures, is a lubricant, a good semiconductor, and can emit photons.

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New Probe Could Improve Sonic Boom Investigation

An air data probe intended to improve investigation of sonic booms is flying on the F-15B aircraft at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center. NASA's goal for sonic boom research is to find ways to control and lessen the noise from shockwaves so that federal regulators will allow commercial supersonic flight over land.

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