News

Mapping Marine Snow on Sea Floor

City-sized maps of terrain and life on the sea floor have revealed that drifts of "marine snow" on submarine hillsides act as a source of food to fuel a higher biomass of marine life than on flatter plains. This finding comes from research by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) that may improve understanding of how hillside slopes and plateaus drive the distribution of marine life. The marine snow was quantified using machine vision, where an algorithm automatically detected the location and coverage in digital images.

Posted in: News, Imaging

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Sandia, Harvard Team Create First Quantum Computer Bridge

This stylized illustration of a quantum bridge shows an array of holes etched in diamond with two silicon atoms placed between the holes. (Illustration courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories) By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

Posted in: News, Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers

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Researchers Create Smallest Transistor Ever

Schematic of a transistor with a molybdenum disulfide channel and 1-nanometer carbon nanotube gate. (Credit: Sujay Desai/UC Berkeley) For more than a decade, engineers have been eyeing the finish line in the race to shrink the size of components in integrated circuits. They knew that the laws of physics had set a 5-nanometer threshold on the size of transistor gates among conventional semiconductors, about one-quarter the size of high-end 20-nanometer-gate transistors now on the market. But some laws are made to be broken, or at least challenged.

Posted in: News, Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers

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T-rays Will “Speed Up” Computer Memory By a Factor of 1,000

The figure shows the spin and lattice structure of thulium orthoferrite (TmFeO₃) on the left and the T-ray-induced transitions between the energy levels of thulium ions (Tm³⁺), which trigger coherent spin dynamics (memory switching), on the right. Together with their colleagues from Germany and the Netherlands, scientists at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have found a way to significantly improve computer performance. They propose the use of so-called T-waves – or terahertz radiation – as a means of resetting computer memory cells. This process is several thousand times faster than magnetic-field-induced switching.

Posted in: News, News, Board-Level Electronics, Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers

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World's 'Smallest Magnifying Glass' Supports New Sensors

Using tiny particles of gold, researchers from the University of Cambridge have concentrated light to smaller than a single atom. By focusing the light to just under a millionth of a meter, the scientists have a "magnifying glass" that reveals individual chemical bonds within molecules.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors

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Smart Buoy Measures Water Pollutants

The current way of using the multi-algae sensor; in the future, it will be operated automatically from buoys, together with other sensors. (Photo: bbe Moldaenke) Extensive water monitoring is indispensable for drinking water supply and water protection. Researchers have developed a smart monitoring system that combines various technologies in a depth-profile-measuring multi-sensor buoy for monitoring water bodies and algae growth. Conventional monitoring strategies are frequently based on a multitude of independently acting sensor systems. This aggravates and slows down integrated data evaluation.

Posted in: News, Measuring Instruments, Test & Measurement

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Ultrasensitive Sensors Keep Driverless Cars Safer

Sensor chips are implemented in CMOS technology. (© Photo Fraunhofer IMS) News of the first serious accident involving an automated electric vehicle made headlines recently. Researchers are counting on light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology, in combination with other components, to fulfill the requirements for independent steering, braking, and acceleration.

Posted in: News, Sensors, Test & Measurement

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