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Will 3D catch on in the long run, and will TV fans and movie buffs demand the technology?

This week’s Question of the Week concerns 3D. The technology offers moviegoers and TV fans an enhanced viewing experience, and many recent 3D films, including Avatar and Alice in Wonderland, have had box office success. Several 3D movies, however, have flopped, and according to a new Nielsen Co. consumer study, many respondents who experience the 3D television technology — and especially the glasses needed to see 3D images — have become less interested in buying a 3D set. What do you think? Will 3D catch on in the long run, and will TV fans and movie buffs demand the technology?

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Should airplanes have families-only sections?

This week's Question of the Week concerns a poll from Skyscanner, a travel fare-comparison Web site. To reduce noise and keep children in one place, sixty percent of more than 2,000 surveyed travelers said it would be a good idea for airplanes to have families-only sections on flights. What do you think? Should airplanes have families-only sections?

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Should the FDA approve genetically engineered salmon?

This week's Question of the Week concerns the issue of genetically engineered food. A firm in Waltham, MA, has developed a genetically modified salmon that grows during the winter as well as the summer, so it reaches an 8-pound market weight in 18 months instead of 36. Accomplished by inserting part of a gene from an ocean pout into the growth gene of a Chinook salmon and then injecting the blended genetic material into the fertilized eggs of a North Atlantic salmon, the FDA is in the process of reviewing what would be the nation's first commercial genetically modified food animal. What do you think? Should the FDA approve genetically engineered salmon? Yes or No?

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Should BP be permitted to continue to drill in the Gulf of Mexico?

This week's Question of the Week concerns the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. According to recent news reports, BP said they may drill a new well in the Macondo reservoir -- the source of one of the world's worst oil spills. Proponents believe that BP's earnings from drilling in the Gulf would allow them to pay the massive fines and costs for cleanup of the spill, while opponents believe the oil giant should sell the rights to the reservoir to another oil company and donate the proceeds from the sale. What do you think? Should BP be permitted to continue to drill in the Gulf of Mexico? Yes or No?

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With the prevalence of e-readers, will e-books eventually replace printed books?

This week's Question of the Week concerns the battle between digital volumes and their printed counterparts. From Amazon's Kindle and Apple's iPad to Sony's e-Reader and Barnes & Noble's Nook, digital reading is obviously here to stay. This is especially true when you take into account how Amazon recently reported that for the first time, e-book sales have overtaken hardcover sales. And, because of their own plummeting sales, mega-retailer Barnes & Noble is currently looking for a buyer to purchase the bookstore chain. What do you think? With the prevalence of e-readers, will e-books eventually replace printed books? Yes or no?

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Is WikiLeaks a threat to national security?

This week's question concerns the recent story about the nearly 92,000 classified U.S. Military documents leaked by the Web site WikiLeaks.org. The organization's Web site claims, "We believe that transparency in government activities leads to reduced corruption, better government, and stronger democracies"; however, critics of the site maintain that it jeopardizes military operations and endangers the privacy rights of others. What do you think? Is WikiLeaks a threat to national security? Yes or no?

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Should brain scans be admissible as legal evidence?

This week's question concerns brain scans and the legal system. In 2008 a judge in India convicted a woman of murdering her fiancee based partly on brain scan evidence that gauged her ability to remember details of the crime. And in the US, fMRI scans have already found their way into courtrooms and more attempts are on the horizon. In response, two psychologists and a law expert from Stanford University conducted a study to determine how much information about memories can be seen in brain activity. Using fMRI to scan the brains of healthy adults, the researchers were able to measure how strong their subjects' sense of a specific memory was; but they could not tell for sure whether the memories themselves were based on a recollection of an actual experience. What do you think? Should brain scans be admissible as legal evidence?

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