News

High-Tech UAV Performs Recon, Defends Brigade

Spc. Jacob Veil, unmanned aircraft systems repairer, pushes an RQ-7B Shadow unmanned aerial vehicle outside a hangar at Wheeler Army Airfield, Hawaii. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Armando Limon) Soldiers assigned to the Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System (TUAS) Platoon, Company D, 29th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, perform daily checks on their RQ-7B Shadow unmanned aerial vehicle, a small, lightweight UAV that provides invaluable service for the battalions of the 3rd BCT.

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Will solar road panels catch on?

This week's Question: Solar Roadways — a startup developing solar powered road panels — will soon install the first solar road tiles in Sandpoint, Idaho. The transparent solar road panels contain colorful LEDs, which can be controlled by a computer to create the impression of signs and lines, without the need of paint. The panels also include heating elements that prevent the accumulation of ice and snow on the road panel's surface. The solar devices can also generate enough energy to power nearby restrooms and fountains. Founder Scott Brusaw says that there are more than 28,000 square miles of paved surface that, if covered with panels, could produce three times more energy than what is needed. What do you think?

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New Device Enables Sample Processing and Optical Detection on Single Chip

A new optofluidic platform for biological sample processing and optical analysis is made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and features tunable optics and novel “lightvalves.” (C. Lagattuta) For well over a decade, electrical engineer Holger Schmidt has been developing devices for optical analysis of samples on integrated chip-based platforms, with applications in areas such as biological sensors, virus detection, and chemical analysis. The latest device from his lab is based on novel technology that combines high-performance microfluidics for sample processing with dynamic optical tuning and switching, all on a low-cost "chip" made of a flexible silicone material.

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Wearable Microscope Measures Fluorescent Dyes through Skin

This microscope can monitor fluorescent biomarkers inside the skin. (Ozcan Research Group/UCLA) UCLA researchers working with a team at Verily Life Sciences have designed a mobile microscope that can detect and monitor fluorescent biomarkers inside the skin with a high level of sensitivity, an important tool in tracking various biochemical reactions for medical diagnostics and therapy.

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Next Generation of Ultrathin Batteries Could Advance Medical Implantables

Yifan Gao, PhD student in the lab of Wyatt Tenhaeff, assistant professor of chemical engineering, works with a iCVD (initiated chemical vapor deposition) reactor, which will be used to synthesize solid electrolytes for 3D microbatteries. (University photo/J. Adam Fenster) A University of Rochester researcher is helping develop next-generation miniature batteries that would expand the use of medical implantables and other devices.

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Nanoscale Sculpturing of Metals Can Improve Biocompatibility for Implants

A strip of aluminum — the surface of which has been treated with an electrochemical etching process — is permanently bonded with thermoplastic by heating. (Julia Siekmann/Kiel Universit) How metals can be used depends particularly on the characteristics of their surfaces. A research team at Kiel University has discovered how they can change the surface properties without affecting the mechanical stability of the metals or changing the metal characteristics themselves. This fundamentally new method is based on using an electrochemical etching process, in which the uppermost layer of a metal is roughened on a micrometer scale in a tightly-controlled manner.

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Researchers Propose Modular Space Telescope

Researchers from California Institute of Technology are proposing the idea of a modular space telescope that could be assembled by robots. The space observatory would have a primary mirror with a diameter of 100 meters — 40 times larger than the Hubble Space Telescope.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Optical Components, Optics

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