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Laser Pattern Generator with Submicron Precision This device is available for use in a wide range of applications including advanced printing systems, patterning photoresist during IC manufacture, and creating masks or reticles for projection-type photolithography systems. More information here. The Technology Business Briefs portray licensing or selling opportunities intermediated by NextTechs. NextTechs Technologies, LLC is a Global Technology Investment Bank engaged in technology offers and needs intermediation in over 41 industries and 141 research disciplines. Search NextTechs' Technology Portfolio here.

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Device Tracks Ad Effectiveness By Monitoring Eye Movement

A device developed at Queen's University (Canada) provides a unique way for advertisers to track the effectiveness of their messages by measuring how many people are looking at their billboards and screens. Called eyebox2(TM), the portable device uses a camera that monitors eye movements in real time and automatically detects when you are looking at it from up to 10 meters away, without calibration. "This camera mimics eye contact perception in humans, allowing us to pinpoint quite accurately what plasma screen or product shelf people are looking at," says Dr. Roel Vertegaal, director of the Human Media Laboratory at Queen's and inventor of the technology. The technology reflects a novel approach to human-computer interactions. The focus of the research is on making everyday devices more attentive to their users by "sensing" when it is appropriate to interact with them. The current research focuses on advertising applications, but future potential uses include attentive computers, cellphones, and household appliances. For more information, click here.

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Less Than One Week Left to Submit Your NNEC Abstract!

The National Nano Engineering Conference (NNEC), being held November 14-15 at the Boston Marriott Copley Place, is the premier event focused on current and future developments in engineering innovations at the nanoscale, as well as the commercialization of nanotechnology. Presentations on exciting new technologies and their commercial applications are currently being accepted in the following four disciplines: Advanced Materials, Bio/Medicine, Electronics, and Energy & Environment. The submission deadline is May 15, 2007. To submit your abstract, click here.

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System Turns Medical Data into Interactive 3D Images

New data-display technology developed at Kent State University will provide doctors with an improved ability to evaluate commonly used medical images. The technology allows for interactive viewing of large image data sets from virtually any medical imaging device. The new system is compatible with all imaging devices, will translate and display data immediately and in its entirety, and allows for user- friendly manipulation of the data for evaluation and analysis. While the technology can be applied to any large 3D or 4D data set, it is most readily applicable to medical images. For instance, CT scans generate large 3D and 4D data sets. The new technology will produce 3D, high-quality, real-time images of the data to help medical professionals more clearly view and rapidly extract important diagnostic information about the body's structures or disease processes. For more information, click here.

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Tech Needs of the Week

Wanted: Orthobiologics to Treat Spine-Related Diseases An organization seeks new orthobiologic technologies (bone replacement materials and antibiotical carriers) that stimulate bone growth in spinal fusion repairs. They also are seeking FDA-approved materials with strength and stiffness close to cortical bone. To respond to this Tech Need, click here. An antimicrobial agent is needed that features a targeted action. The agent will be applied to human hands and must selectively kill transitory microflora, while preserving useful flora. The method must be safe for human use, easily applied, and have a quick action. To respond to this Tech Need, click here. The Technology Needs of the Week are anonymous requests for technology, distributed through the yet2.com marketplace, that you and your organization may be able to fulfill. Responding to a Tech Need is the first step to gaining an introduction with a prospective "buyer" for your technology solution.

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Fully Integrated Prosthetic Arm Provides Sensory Feedback

A research team led by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory has developed a prototype of the first fully integrated prosthetic arm that can be controlled naturally, provides sensory feedback, and allows for eight degrees of freedom. Proto 1 is a complete limb system that also includes a virtual environment used for patient training, clinical configuration, and to record limb movements and control signals during clinical investigations. The natural control and integrated sensory feedback demonstrated with Proto 1 are enabled by Targeted Muscle Reinnervation (TMR), a technique that involves the transfer of residual nerves from an amputated limb to unused muscle regions in appropriate proximity to the injury. During clinical evaluation, a patient demonstrated substantial improvements in functional testing, such as the ability to reposition the thumb for different grips, remove a credit card from a pocket, and stack cups while controlling grip force using sensory feedback versus vision. Click here for the full story.

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Raman Software Named PTB Product of the Month

The LS5 software from HORIBA Jobin Yvon (Edison, NJ) has been named Photonics Tech BriefsÂ’ (PTB) Product of the Month for May. Designed with a kernel-based modular structure, it operates all Raman products including the automated LabRAM ARAMIS, high-resolution LabRAM HR, and T64000 triple spectrograph. The software records Raman images in any shape or format. The software incorporates custom accessories such as FT-IR, temperature-controlled stages, and additional detectors. For more information, see page 20a of the May issue of PTB or click here.

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