News

Should the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico affect the President’s energy plan?

This week’s question concerns the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. After a rig leased by BP Plc exploded and sank last week in the Gulf, many have indicated that the President may experience a setback in his plan to expand offshore drilling. The plan is supposed to be part of a transition to a new energy economy that relies less on imported fossil fuel and more on domestic power from the sun and wind. What do you think? Should the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico affect the President’s energy plan?

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Genetically Engineering Algae for Biodiesel

John Morgan, an associate professor of chemical engineering at Purdue University, is leading a portion of a federally funded effort based at Iowa State University aimed at creating genetically engineered algae for biodiesel production.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Biomass, Energy, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, Alternative Fuels, Green Design & Manufacturing, Greenhouse Gases

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Bionic Coating for Fuel-Efficient Ships

The water fern salvinia molesta is extremely hydrophobic, surrounding itself by a flimsy skirt of air that prevents the plant from coming into contact with liquid. This inconspicuous plant could allow ships to have a 10 percent decrease in fuel consumption.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency

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Will digital actors ever replace humans in Hollywood?

This week's question concerns the concept of "digital actors." They've appeared in "Avatar," "The Matrix," and "The Lord of the Rings," to name a few. And with the recent surge of 3D technology in filmmaking, it appears that digital actors will be working a lot more in Hollywood. What do you think? Will digital actors ever replace humans in Hollywood?

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Generating Hydrogen from Water

Researchers with Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley have discovered an inexpensive metal catalyst that can effectively generate hydrogen gas from water.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Alternative Fuels, Green Design & Manufacturing, Greenhouse Gases

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Thin Film Absorbers for Solar Cells

Oregon State University researchers have made an important breakthrough in the use of continuous flow microreactors to produce thin film absorbers for solar cells - an innovative technology that could significantly reduce the cost of solar energy devices and reduce material waste.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Renewable Energy, Solar Power

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Should broadband providers be required to provide network neutrality?

This week's question concerns "net neutrality" -- providing equal treatment to all Internet traffic flowing over networks. Supporters of net neutrality argue that a policy is necessary to prevent providers from favoring or discriminating against certain Web sites and online services; however, broadband providers contend that they should be able to sell premium services and manage their systems to prevent certain applications from sucking up capacity. What do you think? Should broadband providers be required to provide network neutrality?

Posted in: Question of the Week

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