News

Electronic Monitoring For Coastal Waters

With a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant, researchers from North Carolina State University are developing a cost-effective electronic monitoring system that will advance understanding of critical coastal ecosystems by allowing users to track water-quality data from these waters in real time.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Environmental Monitoring, Green Design & Manufacturing, Remediation Technologies
Read More >>

Should Congress pass the Right to Repair Act?

This week's Question of the Week, a suggestion from INSIDER reader Glenn Barkley, concerns the Right to Repair Act, a bill that would require auto manufacturers to sell to non-dealer repair shops the complete repair information and diagnostic tools, currently only provided to dealer service centers. Supporters say the auto companies currently refuse to give the information to independent repair shops, and consumers are forced to have repairs done at the more expensive dealer service centers. Opponents say the proposal would force auto manufacturers to disclose trade secrets and other proprietary information to their competition.

What do you think? Should Congress pass the Right to Repair Act? Yes or no?

Posted in: Question of the Week
Read More >>

Nanostructuring Technology Creates Efficient, Ultra-Small Displays

University of Michigan scientists have created pixels that will enable LED-projected and -wearable displays to be more energy efficient with more light manipulation possible - all on a display that may eventually be as small as a postage stamp.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Lighting
Read More >>

New Facility Aims to Make LED Lighting More Natural

A new lab at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is dedicated to improving the quality of light that light-emitting diodes (LEDs) produce. NIST vision scientists Wendy Davis and Yoshi Ohno and a team of physicists created the NIST Spectrally Tunable Lighting Facility (STLF).

Posted in: News, Lighting
Read More >>

New Equation Could Advance Research in Solar Cells and OLEDs

An equation developed in part by researchers at the University of Michigan could do for organic semiconductors what the Shockley ideal diode equation did for inorganic semiconductors: help to enable their wider adoption.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Solar Power, Lighting
Read More >>

Improving and Evaluating LED Lighting for Greenhouse Use

Purdue researchers will collaborate with Rutgers University, the University of Arizona, Michigan State University, and Orbital Technologies Corp. (Madison, WI) on a four-year project to improve and evaluate LED lighting for greenhouse use. The goal is to increase greenhouse yields and decrease producers' energy costs.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Lighting
Read More >>

Will you drive this type of robotic car in your lifetime?

This week's Question of the Week addresses another technical development from Google. In early October, the search giant announced that it has been testing robotic cars on U.S. city streets. The vehicles, equipped with a complex array of sensors and cameras that allowed them to steer around cars and obstacles, operated autonomously as they navigated their way down roads and highways. A driver was also able to take over control at all times as a safety precaution.

What do you think? Will you drive this type of robotic car in your lifetime?

Posted in: Question of the Week
Read More >>

Should there be a large-scale freeze on foreclosures?

This week's Question of the Week addresses home foreclosures. Several major home lenders, including JP Morgan Chase and Bank of America, have suspended foreclosures in parts or all of the country because of sloppy paperwork and improper oversight of the many loans that went bad. Some say, absent a functioning foreclosure system, mortgage lending - and the economy itself - will continue to be sluggish. Others have suggested that foreclosures devastate families, and no homeowner should have private property taken from him or her wrongfully; some also support a national moratorium on foreclosures.

What do you think? Should there be a large-scale freeze on foreclosures?

Posted in: Question of the Week
Read More >>

Silicon Strategy Shows Promise for Lithium-ion Batteries

Scientists from Rice University and Lockheed Martin have discovered a way to use simple silicon to radically increase the capacity of lithium-ion batteries. The researchers are confident that cheap, plentiful silicon combined with ease of manufacture could help push their idea into the mainstream.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Batteries, Electronics & Computers, Energy, Energy Storage, Transportation
Read More >>

Do you plan to buy the Google TV device?

This week's Question of the Week addresses Google TV. Engineers are putting the finishing touches on Google TV, a software platform that aims to bring the complete Internet experience to television sets. Expected in stores later this month, the Google TV device has a remote-control keyboard/pointing device that navigates users to both channels and Internet sites.

What do you think? Do you plan to buy the Google TV device?

Posted in: Question of the Week
Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.