News

Promise for Hydrogen-Fueled Cars

A new process for storing and generating hydrogen to run fuel cells in cars has been invented by chemical engineers at Purdue University. The process uses a powdered chemical called ammonia borane, which has one of the highest hydrogen contents of all solid materials.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Alternative Fuels, Energy, Energy Storage, Green Design & Manufacturing, Recycling Technologies
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Microbial Genetic System Dissects Biomass to Biofuel Conversion

A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers, working with the DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), has made a critical step in the development of cost-effective cellulosic biofuels.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Alternative Fuels, Biomass, Energy, Renewable Energy, Green Design & Manufacturing
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Should CO2 emissions be regulated?

This week’s question concerns the EPA’s regulation of greenhouse gas emissions. Last Thursday, the US Senate failed to pass legislation that would have prevented the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from regulating CO2 emissions from large factories, electric power companies, and automobiles.

What do you think? Should CO2 emissions be regulated? Yes or no?

Posted in: Question of the Week
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Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Underground

A technique originally applied to monitor the flow of contaminants into shallow groundwater supplies has been repurposed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers to monitor carbon dioxide pumped deep underground for storage.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Environmental Monitoring, Green Design & Manufacturing, Greenhouse Gases
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Scientists Use Nanoscale Architecture to Make Efficient Solar Cell

A thin film solar cell must be thick enough to collect a sufficient amount of light, yet it needs to be thin enough to extract current. Boston College physicists found a way to resolve the "thick & thin" challenge through a nanoscale solar architecture based on the coaxial cable.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Solar Power
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Should Google be liable for "bad" directions that lead to injury?

This week's question concerns a recent news item about how a Utah woman injured by a motorist while following a Google Maps route has filed a lawsuit claiming Google supplied unsafe directions (the motorist is also named in the lawsuit). The woman used her phone to download directions from one end of Park City, UT, to the other. Google Maps led her to a four-lane boulevard without sidewalks that was "not reasonably safe for pedestrians," according to the lawsuit. The woman believed she could reach a sidewalk on the other side of the boulevard and therefore tried to cross. A car struck her before she even reached the median. The woman received multiple bone fractures that required six weeks of rehabilitation.

What do you think? Should Google be liable for "bad" directions that lead to injury? Yes or no?

Posted in: Question of the Week
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Low-Noise Current Controller Increases Detection of Trace Gases

A low-noise current controller developed at DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was recently licensed to Wavelength Electronics Inc. (Bozeman, MT). The device delivers stable and reliable power to the lasers used in gas sensors, for use in analyzing trace atmospheric gases.

Posted in: GDM, News, Products, News, Environmental Monitoring, Green Design & Manufacturing
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Funding Opportunity for R&D in Solid-State Lighting

DOE recently announced two solid-state lighting (SSL) funding opportunities. DOE will select projects to receive up to $25 million to advance research, development, and market adoption of SSL technology. Up to $15 million is available for core technology research, and up to $10 million for product development.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Government, Lighting
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Does synthetic biology cross an ethical line?

This week's question concerns synthetic biology research. A study published online by the journal "Science" details how scientists at the J. Craig Venter Institute recently developed the first viable cell controlled by a synthetic genome. According to the researchers, the cell is called synthetic because it is totally derived from a synthetic chromosome, made with chemicals, a chemical synthesizer, and information in a computer. They hope to use this method to probe the basic machinery of life and to engineer bacteria specially designed to solve environmental or energy problems.

What do you think? Does synthetic biology cross an ethical line?

Posted in: Question of the Week
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Energy-Efficient Housing Research Partnerships

On behalf of the DOE’s Building America residential research program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP). Building America research teams will be selected to develop cost-effective solutions that improve the quality and energy efficiency of U.S. homes.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Government
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