News

Princeton's Plastics Hold Potential for Lowering Cost of Solar Panels

Princeton University engineers have developed translucent, malleable, and electricity-conducting plastics, which could represent a low-cost alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) - an expensive conducting material currently used in solar panels.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Solar Power
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New Path to Solar Energy Via Solid-State Photovoltaics

Berkeley Lab researchers have found a new mechanism by which the photovoltaic effect can take place in semiconductor thin-films. This new route to energy production overcomes the bandgap voltage limitation that continues to plague conventional solid-state solar cells.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Solar Power
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The Smallest Superconductor in the World

Scientists have discovered the world’s smallest superconductor - a sheet of four pairs of molecules less than one nanometer wide. The Ohio University-led study provides the first evidence that nanoscale molecular superconducting wires can be fabricated, which could be used for nanoscale electronic devices and energy applications.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy
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Is cold fusion possible?

This week's question concerns the concept of cold fusion. Cold fusion refers to the nuclear fusion of atoms at conditions close to room temperature, which (theoretically) has the potential to produce an abundant source of energy at low cost. Once thought of as "junk science," cold fusion is slowly gaining acceptance in the mainstream scientific community.

What do you think? Is cold fusion possible?

Posted in: Question of the Week
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New Alloys Key to Efficient Solar Energy and Lighting

A recent advance by Arizona State University researchers in developing nanowires could lead to more efficient photovoltaic cells as well as better LEDs. ASU electrical engineers are working to improve quaternary alloy semiconductor nanowire materials.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, Lighting
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Would you have a microchip implanted under your skin if concrete benefits were derived from it?

This week's question concerns a recent poll that was taken prior to the opening of the CeBIT Trade show that was held in Germany last week. The poll, conducted by the German IT industry lobby group BITKOM, asked participants whether or not they would have a microchip implanted in their body if they derived concrete benefits from it (concrete benefits were defined as assisting medical/fire personnel to rescue you more quickly, making shopping go more smoothly, etc.). One in four said yes.

What do you think? Would you have a microchip implanted under your skin if concrete benefits were derived from it?

Posted in: Question of the Week
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Check out the March Lighting Technology Ezine

The first issue of Lighting Technology has arrived! This digital magazine is the latest offering from Green Design & Manufacturing, and features articles, tech briefs, applications and more regarding advances in energy-efficient LEDs and solid-state lighting.

Posted in: GDM, News, Lighting
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Intelligent Energy Management

Smart meters – intelligent devices to measure consumption – make it possible to read and control power consumption, even of private households, while away from the property. New software shadows the electricity meter and that ensures energy consumption is adjusted accordingly.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage
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Process Yields High-Energy-Density Plant-Based Transportation Fuel

A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has developed a highly efficient, environmentally friendly process that selectively converts gamma-valerolactone - a biomass derivative - into the chemical equivalent of jet fuel. The process preserves about 95 percent of the energy from the original biomass.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Alternative Fuels, Biomass, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Green Design & Manufacturing, Greenhouse Gases
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Could a sin tax make people eat healthier?

This week's question concerns the U.S.'s ongoing efforts to encourage healthier eating. States across the nation are beginning to impose "sin taxes" on fat and sugar to dissuade people from eating junk food. The thought is that if you make it cheaper, people will eat more of it, more expensive and people will eat less.

What do you think? Could a sin tax make people eat healthier?

Posted in: Question of the Week
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