News

Moth Gyroscopes

A joint effort between University of Washington (Seattle, WA) and Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH) researchers has revealed gyroscope-like structures in tobacco horn moth antennae that could lead to mechanical equivalents for miniature flying robots. The discovery allows the researchers to understand neural properties employing methods typically used to analyze electronic circuits, and the work also could be adapted in the development of robotic insects to test the understanding of flight itself. “We are really good at building gyros for a 747 airplane, but if we want to make autonomous flying machines the size of a bird or smaller, we will need to engineer a version of the vibrating antennae. This information has the potential to help us design gyro-like stabilization capabilities for a small flying robot,” said Case biologist Mark Willis, who worked on the project. Click here for the full story. View a video of the moth's flight here .

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Nano 50â„¢ Awards

Nanotech Briefs magazine is now accepting nominations for its thirdannual Nano 50 awards competition. The Nano 50 recognizes the top 50 technologies, innovators, and products with the greatest potential to advance the commercialization of nanotechnology. There is no cost to submit a nomination. All nominations must be submitted by March 16, 2007. For complete rules, and to submit a nomination, visit the official web site here.

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Event Alert

Free Webinar: Join us and other engineering professionals at the "Adobe and Alibre Technology Seminar" on Wednesday, February 28. Alibre, Inc. and Adobe Inc. are coming together to provide an informative online seminar that reviews how other leading-edge companies have used new and affordable technology to redefine their design process. Click here for more info.

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Current Attractions

The Air Force's Technology Horizons magazine is now Defense Tech Briefs (DTB),providing engineers with a one-stop source for the latest advances and tech transfer opportunities from Defense Department R&D programs. Commercially promising inventions resulting from this work are reported in DTB magazine, published bi-monthly and mailed with NASA Tech Briefs. Here are some of the technologies featured in the February issue: --Assembly of Nanowire-Based Computing SystemsA program to develop ultra-dense integrated digital data-processing systems and circuits based on nanowires has been developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory, (Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH). The program involves utilization of hybrid top-down and bottom-up assembly techniques to implement designs representative of a highly reliable defect- and fault-tolerant architecture. (Page 21) --Measuring Glucose Using pH-Sensitive HydrogelsSensors that exploit pH-sensitive hydrogels for measuring concentrations of glucose in aqueous solutions are undergoing development at the Army Research Laboratory (Adelphi, MD). Because the underlying chemical and physical principles are also applicable to sensing biochemicals other than glucose, it is expected to be relatively easy to modify the glucose sensors to enable detection of such biochemicals. (Page 29)Read these and previously published tech briefs here.

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Tech Needs

Technologies are needed for the economical production of polymers that are based on today's generally accepted standards for "green" chemistry. Of particular interest are chemistries that produce safe chemicals, and/or that use safer solvents and auxiliaries, and/or that produce chemicals designed for degradation. Click here to respond to this Tech Need. A global specialty chemical company is seeking innovative "green" renewable raw materials, products, and processes for replacement of existing non-environmentally friendly solvents, while not compromising the performance or significantly increasing the cost. Click here to respond to this Tech Need. The Technology Needs of the Week are anonymous requests for technology, distributed through the yet2.com marketplace, that you and your organizationmay be able to fulfill. Responding to a Tech Need is the first step to gaining an introduction with a prospective "buyer" for your technology solution.

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X-Ray Vision

Brown University researchers are creating a technology that will allow doctors and scientists to see inside living humans and animals, and watch their bones move in 3D as they run, fly, jump, swim, and slither. This high-resolution, high-speed imaging system will contribute to better treatments for knee, shoulder, wrist, and back injuries, and help scientists understand the evolution of complex movements. Dubbed CTX, the system will combine the 3D capability of CT scanners and the real-time movement tracking of cinefluoroscopy. The technology is expected to deliver images with exceptional precision and detail. Researchers will beable to track 3D skeletal movements with 0.1 millimeter accuracy and see the equivalent of 1,000 CT images per second. Read the full story.

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Event Alert

Fastening Technology & Bolted Joint Design Seminar February 27-28, 2007 Detroit, Michigan USA This two-day seminar gives engineers and technical personnel current specifications for, and a better understanding of, the complexities of mechanical joining with fasteners. Featured topics include bolted/screwed joints, elastic interactions and preload stress, loosening causalities, tightening methods, calculating safety factors and limitations, selecting optimal fasteners for your design, evaluating dissimilar materials for thermal expansion and galvanic properties, and insights into materials, threads, and product standards. For full details and to register click here, or call 1-877-755-2272 (USA) or 973-560-9092, or contact info@SeminarsForEngineers.com.

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