News

Will VR be the new way to watch sports?

This week's Question: Fox Sports offered virtual-reality streams from last week's U.S. Open, a major golf championship in Oakmont, PA. Sports fans who owned the right devices could watch the golf event on the television while using VR for enhancements: game recaps, highlights of a particular play, features, and brief cut-ins to live play. Virtual reality still faces adoption challenges. Viewers need to buy special equipment to view the broadcast, and the users may find the devices too inconvenient and cumbersome to wear regularly. What do you think? Will VR be the new way to watch sports?

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will AI improve vehicle safety by 2020?

This week's Question: As the competition to develop self-driving cars intensifies, Toyota Motor Corp. announced that over the next five years the company will spend $1 billion on the integration of artificial intelligence (AI). Gill Pratt, CEO of Toyota Research Institute, recently said Toyota aims to improve car safety by enabling vehicles to anticipate and avoid potential accident situations. While today's driver assistance systems largely use image sensors to avoid obstacles within the car’s lane, Pratt said TRI was looking at AI solutions to enable "the car to be evasive beyond the one lane."

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

3D-Printed Polymer Turns Methane to Methanol

By combining biology and 3D printing, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists have created a reactor that continuously produces methanol from methane at room temperature and pressure.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Researchers Test Galaxy-Seeking Robots

A telescope project from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) will use a planned array of 5,000 galaxy-seeking robots to produce a 3D map of the universe. Dubbed ProtoDESI, the scaled-down, 10-robot system will help scientists achieve the pinpoint accuracy needed to home in on millions of galaxies, quasars, and stars with the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI).

Posted in: News

Read More >>

SLED-Based Broadband Near-Infrared Source

Avo Photonics (Horsham, PA) design, development, and manufacturing, was commissioned by Luxmux Technology Corporation, to develop and manufacture a solid-state, broadband, continuous emitter for use with their line of miniature integrated spectrometers. The emitter combines the outputs of multiple super-luminescent LEDs (SLEDs) into a polarization-maintaining single-mode fiber. Such an accomplishment required collimating multiple beams and achieving collinearity to an overlap of 700 um and pointing to within 250 urad. The result is a >100 mw, fiber-coupled source with continuous emission over the 1250 – 1750 nm band. To learn more, click here.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Short Pulse Seed Laser Diode Driver

Analog Modules, Inc. (Longwood, FL) recently released its short pulse seed laser diode driver, Model 766. The Model 766 offers user-adjustable pulse width capability as low as 150ps up to 1ns for driving 14-pin butterfly packaged laser diode modules at output currents up to 1.1A. Applications include seeding fiber lasers for materials processing, time-resolved spectroscopy, LIDAR and others. The driver circuitry operates from a single 5V power source. All other needed voltages are generated on the board by high efficiency switching power supplies. The driver supplies a bidirectional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) thermoelectric cooler controller (TEC) with current capability of 3A and voltage capability of 4.2V. To learn more, click here

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Core Alignment Fusion Splicer

Furukawa Electric (Tokyo, Japan) and OFS (Norcross, GA) recently introduced the FITEL S179 Hand-Held, Core Alignment Fusion Splicer. The FITEL S179 Fusion Splicer can be used on all Metro, LAN and FTTx fibers, including ultra-bend insensitive fibers. The FITEL S179 Fusion Splicer’s large-capacity battery system allows 200 splicing cycles (splicing/heating) in one charge. A 4.3-inch wide LCD screen with touch panel offers easy and intuitive operation and a proportionately wide splicing chamber makes optical fiber easier to load. For improved visibility in low-light conditions, 3 +1 LED lights illuminate the entire splicing chamber. To learn more, click here

Posted in: News

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.