News

Air Force Is Developing Mach 18 Wind Tunnel

Mike Smith, AEDC optical diagnostic physicist, verifies the Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy system is functioning properly prior to conducting tests in support of risk reduction for a new test capability that will increase Mach number of AEDC Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9 at White Oak, Md. (U.S. Air Force photo/A.J. Spicer) The Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9 team is conducting tests in support of risk reduction for a new test capability that will be revolutionary for AEDC and the U.S. Air Force. The capability involves increasing the Mach number of what AEDC is currently able to achieve at Tunnel 9 in White Oak, Md., from Mach 14 to Mach 18.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Software Gives Bomb Techs X-Ray Vision

In a training session, bomb techs use Sandia National Laboratories’ XTK software to stitch together X-ray images of a suspicious package. The XTK team spent hundreds of hours with Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians learning how they work. (Photo courtesy of the National Nuclear Security Administration) In the chaos that followed the terrorist attack at the 2013 Boston Marathon, bomb squads scanned packages at the scene for explosive devices. Two homemade pressure cooker bombs had killed three people and injured more than 250, and techs quickly had to determine if more were waiting to blow up.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

High-Tech UAV Performs Recon, Defends Brigade

Spc. Jacob Veil, unmanned aircraft systems repairer, pushes an RQ-7B Shadow unmanned aerial vehicle outside a hangar at Wheeler Army Airfield, Hawaii. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Armando Limon) Soldiers assigned to the Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System (TUAS) Platoon, Company D, 29th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, perform daily checks on their RQ-7B Shadow unmanned aerial vehicle, a small, lightweight UAV that provides invaluable service for the battalions of the 3rd BCT.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Will solar road panels catch on?

This week's Question: Solar Roadways — a startup developing solar powered road panels — will soon install the first solar road tiles in Sandpoint, Idaho. The transparent solar road panels contain colorful LEDs, which can be controlled by a computer to create the impression of signs and lines, without the need of paint. The panels also include heating elements that prevent the accumulation of ice and snow on the road panel's surface. The solar devices can also generate enough energy to power nearby restrooms and fountains. Founder Scott Brusaw says that there are more than 28,000 square miles of paved surface that, if covered with panels, could produce three times more energy than what is needed. What do you think?

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

New Device Enables Sample Processing and Optical Detection on Single Chip

A new optofluidic platform for biological sample processing and optical analysis is made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and features tunable optics and novel “lightvalves.” (C. Lagattuta) For well over a decade, electrical engineer Holger Schmidt has been developing devices for optical analysis of samples on integrated chip-based platforms, with applications in areas such as biological sensors, virus detection, and chemical analysis. The latest device from his lab is based on novel technology that combines high-performance microfluidics for sample processing with dynamic optical tuning and switching, all on a low-cost "chip" made of a flexible silicone material.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Wearable Microscope Measures Fluorescent Dyes through Skin

This microscope can monitor fluorescent biomarkers inside the skin. (Ozcan Research Group/UCLA) UCLA researchers working with a team at Verily Life Sciences have designed a mobile microscope that can detect and monitor fluorescent biomarkers inside the skin with a high level of sensitivity, an important tool in tracking various biochemical reactions for medical diagnostics and therapy.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Next Generation of Ultrathin Batteries Could Advance Medical Implantables

Yifan Gao, PhD student in the lab of Wyatt Tenhaeff, assistant professor of chemical engineering, works with a iCVD (initiated chemical vapor deposition) reactor, which will be used to synthesize solid electrolytes for 3D microbatteries. (University photo/J. Adam Fenster) A University of Rochester researcher is helping develop next-generation miniature batteries that would expand the use of medical implantables and other devices.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.