News

Robotic System Builds Biggest Composite Rocket Parts Ever Made

One of the largest composites manufacturing robots created in America will help NASA build the biggest lightweight composite parts ever made for space vehicles. The robot will build structures larger than 26 feet in diameter. The robot travelled across the country from Electroimpact, Inc. in Mukilteo, WA. Electroimpact engineers worked with NASA Marshall engineers to customize the robot and supporting software for building large space structures.

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Are Internet-connected cars worth the risk?

This week's Question: Last week, researchers from the University of California - San Diego discovered a vulnerability that allowed a 2013 Corvette to be hacked. The security flaw was found in dashboard hardware commonly used by insurance firms and transportation companies to monitor location, speed, and efficiency. By sending carefully crafted SMS messages, the hackers were able to control the vehicle's driving components, including its wipers, locks, and even brakes (when driving at slow speeds). The Corvette hack is one of a recent string of vulnerabilities found in vehicles, including cars from automakers like Tesla, GM, and Jeep. What do you think? Are Internet-connected cars worth the risk?  

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3D Projection Improves Robot-to-Human Communication

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a way for robots to project their next action into the 3D world and onto any moving object, such as car parts on an assembly line. The achievement will help to improve human and robot safety in manufacturing scenarios.

Posted in: News, Machinery & Automation, Robotics

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Smart Building Responds to all Climate Conditions

A grid of sensors embedded into an innovative building insulation activates specific façade components to optimize energy savings while improving aesthetics. This high-tech kind of retrofitting approach uses several types of modules that allow real-time monitoring. The multifunctional modular façade system is able to adapt to a variety of climatic conditions.

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Vibration Table Promises Different Ways of Testing

Vibration machines are crucial to test the forces that make things fall apart in the bumpy real world, from small components to complete systems like airplanes or nuclear weapons. Large, high-frequency vibration machines that shake things in several directions simultaneously are relatively new. Sandia National Laboratories has developed a large, high-frequency, 6-degrees-of-freedom (6DOF) vibration machine to qualify weapons components and revolutionize the way it does mechanical testing.

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Measurements of Pluto’s Atmosphere Reveal Surprises

NASA's New Horizons probe performed the first-ever flyby of Pluto, zooming within 7,800 miles of its frigid surface. The close encounter is giving researchers their first up-close looks at Pluto, which has remained mysterious since its 1930 discovery.

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Can an app improve your mood?

This week's Question: Smartwatches allow users to track exercise, heart rate, and other health factors, but what about mood? The design studio Ustwo has a new app that aims for a more approachable model of delivering psychological therapy. The technology, called Moodnotes, acts as a basic journaling app. The user responds to Moodnotes prompts, such as "How are you?" and "What's happening at the moment?" The entries are archived and shown in a "Moodtrends" chart, which potentially reveals thinking patterns. If a thought pattern is determined to be affecting a user’s mood, the technology encourages the person to rethink a situation. What do you think? Can an app improve your mood?  

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