News

Slim Wing Can Reduce Aircraft Fuel Use and Emissions by 50%

NASA and Boeing are designing a longer, thinner, and lighter wing that requires a brace, or truss, to provide it with extra support. The lower-drag wing will reduce both fuel burn and carbon emissions by at least 50% over current-technology transport aircraft, and by 4 to 8% compared to equivalent advanced-technology conventional configurations with unbraced wings.

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Material Sniffs Out Fuel Leaks and Fuel-Based Explosives

Alkane fuel is a key ingredient in combustible material such as airplane fuel. Yet it’s difficult to detect and there are no portable scanners available that can sniff out the odorless and colorless vapor. University of Utah engineers developed fiber material for a handheld scanner that can detect small traces of alkane fuel vapor, a valuable advancement that could be an early-warning signal for leaks in an airliner, or for locating a terrorist’s explosive.

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New Material Eliminates the Need for Aircraft Deicers

Scientists have developed a liquid-like substance that can make aircraft wings and other surfaces so slippery that ice cannot adhere. The slick substance is secreted from a film on the wing’s surface as temperatures drop below freezing and retreats back into the film as temperatures rise. The liquid-secreting materials are called self-lubricating organogels, or SLUGs.

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Will you wear “e-textiles”?

This week's Question: Researchers at The Ohio State University have embroidered circuits into fabric with 0.1-mm precision — an ideal size to integrate electronic components, such as sensors and computer memory devices, into clothing. With the advance, the team has taken the next step toward the design of functional textiles — clothes that gather, store, or transmit digital information. The development could lead to shirts that act as antennas for your smartphone, workout clothes that monitor your fitness level, a bandage that monitors your health, or even a flexible fabric cap that senses brain activity. What do you think? Will you wear “e-textiles”?  

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Wild Mushrooms Support New Battery Anodes

Researchers at Purdue University have created electrodes from a species of wild fungus called Tyromyces fissilis.  Carbon fibers derived from the sustainable source have been shown to outperform conventional graphite electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

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InGaAs Imaging Sensor

New Imaging Technologies (Verrières le Buisson, France) introduces the NSC1401, a new analog wide dynamic range InGaAs sensor series in 320x256 pixels (QVGA). The NSC1401 uses a new generation of ROIC with 320x256 pixels at 25um pitch coupled to an InGaAs retina that operates in WDR mode and global shutter. The spectral response range goes from 900nm to 1700nm. The analog front end is designed to achieve extremely low input noise and ultra-fast response time down to 200ns for applications such as active imaging. The sensor operates both in linear integration mode and in log response. The NSC1401 can operate without TEC within an ambient temperature range from -40°C to 70°C.

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Flexible Sheet Camera Wraps Around Objects

A novel sheet camera developed by Columbia Engineering researchers can be wrapped around everyday objects to capture images that cannot be taken with one or more conventional cameras.

Posted in: News, Cameras

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