Batteries
Germanium Nanowires Could Improve Batteries
Posted in Batteries, Power Supplies, Materials, Metals, Medical, News, MDB on Thursday, 04 September 2014
A team of scientists at Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, developed a one-step approach to growing germanium nanowires from an aqueous solution. They say that their process may lead to a simpler, less expensive way to use germanium in lithium-ion batteries.
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Water Splitter Runs on AAA Battery
Posted in Batteries, Electronics & Computers, Power Management, Alternative Fuels, Green Design & Manufacturing, Materials, Metals, Energy, News on Friday, 22 August 2014
Scientists at Stanford University have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis.  The battery sends an electric current through two electrodes that split liquid water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. Unlike other water splitters that use precious-metal catalysts, the electrodes in the Stanford device are made of inexpensive and abundant nickel and iron.

In addition to producing hydrogen, the novel water splitter could be used to make chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide, an important industrial chemical.

Splitting water to make hydrogen requires no fossil fuels and emits no greenhouse gases. But scientists have yet to develop an affordable, active water splitter with catalysts capable of working at industrial scales.

"It's been a constant pursuit for decades to make low-cost electrocatalysts with high activity and long durability," said Stanford University Professor Hongjie Dai. "When we found out that a nickel-based catalyst is as effective as platinum, it came as a complete surprise."

Source

Also: Learn about a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell.
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Sweat Powers These Tattoo Biobatteries
Posted in Batteries, Power Supplies, Medical, Patient Monitoring, News, MDB on Monday, 18 August 2014
A team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego, has designed a sensor applied as a temporary tattoo that can not only monitor a person’s progress during exercise but produce power generated by their perspiration that may be used to energize small electronic devices.
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Designing a Pure Lithium Anode
Posted in Batteries, Electronic Components, Power Supplies, Electronics, Power Management, Medical, News, MDB on Tuesday, 05 August 2014
The race is on to design smaller, cheaper, and more efficient rechargeable batteries to meet power storage needs. Now, a team of researchers at Stanford University report that they have taken a big step toward designing a pure lithium anode, which, they say, would greatly advance current lithium ion batteries.
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FDA Recognizes Two UL Battery Safety Standards for Medical Devices
Posted in Batteries, Electronic Components, Power Supplies, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs, Medical, News, MDB on Wednesday, 23 July 2014
UL (Underwriters Laboratories), Northbrook, IL, announced that the FDA has recognized two UL battery safety standards as consensus standards for medical devices incorporating lithium or nickel-based batteries. The two standards are UL 2054 - Standard for Household and Commercial Batteries, and UL 1642 - Standard for Lithium Batteries (Cells).
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New Chemistry Enables Longer-Lived Batteries
Posted in Batteries, Electronic Components, Power Supplies, Electronics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, News, MDB on Wednesday, 07 May 2014
Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee say they have developed a new type of battery chemistry aimed at producing batteries that last longer than previously thought possible.
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Nanomaterial Extends Lithium-Sulfur Battery Lifespan
Posted in Batteries, Electronics & Computers, Power Management, Materials, Metals, Nanotechnology, News on Friday, 18 April 2014
A new nanomaterial could extend the lifespan of lithium-sulfur batteries, and therefore the driving range of electric vehicles.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers added the powder to the battery's cathode to capture problematic polysulfides that usually cause lithium-sulfur batteries to fail after a few charges.

Metal organic frameworks — also called MOFs — are crystal-like compounds made of metal clusters connected to organic molecules, or linkers. Together, the clusters and linkers assemble into porous 3-D structures.

During lab tests, a lithium-sulfur battery with PNNL's MOF cathode maintained 89 percent of its initial power capacity after 100 charge-and discharge cycles. Having shown the effectiveness of their MOF cathode, PNNL researchers now plan to further improve the cathode's mixture of materials so it can hold more energy.

Source

Also: Check out other Materials tech briefs.
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