Batteries
Novel Biological Sources for Implantable Battery Materials
Posted in News, Batteries, Electronics on Monday, 23 December 2013
Where will the next source of electrode materials for batteries to power edible medical devices come from? Would you believe, from marine cuttlefish? Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, say that melanin pigments in cuttlefish ink provides the perfect chemistry and nanostructure to power tiny electronic devices that can be either ingested or implanted into the body for applications ranging from biosensing to drug delivery.
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Scientists Invent Self-healing Battery Electrode
Posted in News, Batteries, Electronics, Coatings & Adhesives on Thursday, 28 November 2013
A team of researchers from Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made the first battery electrode that heals itself, opening a new and potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries.
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Mercury-Free Nickel Zinc Batteries
Posted in Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Products, Batteries, Electronics, Power Supplies on Monday, 01 July 2013
VARTA Microbattery, White Plains, NY, announces new mercury-free primary Nickel Zinc (NiOOH) Battery Systems. VARTA Microbattery's nickel zinc cells are developed as an ideal cost-effective and highly reliable substitute to conventional primary silver oxide but ton cells and are manufactured with high quality raw materials , unparalleled leakage protection, size, shape, and quality standards equivalent to VARTA Micro-battery’s popular mercury-free primary silver oxide system.
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Creating Cathodes for Air-Breathing Biobatteries
Posted in Electronics, Features, Batteries, Electronic Components, Electronics, Power Supplies on Wednesday, 01 May 2013
Devices that support various functions of our bodies are being used increasingly. Today, they include cardiac pacemakers or hearing aids. Tomorrow, they may be contact lenses with automatically changing focal length or computer-controlled displays generating images directly in the eye. But, none of these devices will work if not coupled to an efficient and long-lasting power supply source. Researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IPC PAS) in Warsaw say that the best solution seems to be miniaturized biofuel cells that consume substances naturally occurring in the human body or in its immediate surroundings.
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Developing Edible Electronics for the Medical Device Industry
Posted in News, Batteries, Electronics, Drug Delivery & Fluid Handling, Implants & Prosthetics on Friday, 19 April 2013
Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, are developing edible electronic devices that can be implanted in the body, and say that the device could be programmed and deployed in the gastrointestinal tract or the small intestine and once the battery packaging is in place, they can activate the battery.

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Scaling Up Production of Graphene Micro-Supercapacitors
Posted in News, Batteries, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics, Power Management, Power Supplies on Tuesday, 12 March 2013
The demand for ever-smaller electronic devices has led to the miniaturization of a variety of technologies, but energy-storage units, such as batteries and capacitors, have lagged behind. Now, researchers at UCLA say that they have developed an innovative technique using a DVD burner to fabricate micro-scale graphene-based supercapacitors, which can charge and discharge a hundred to a thousand times faster than standard batteries. These micro-supercapacitors, made from a one-atom–thick layer of graphitic carbon, can be easily manufactured and readily integrated into small devices such as next-generation pacemakers, they say.

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New Stretchable Battery for Stretchable Electronics
Posted in News, Batteries, Electronics, Implants & Prosthetics on Monday, 04 March 2013
Researchers at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL and the University of Illinois have demonstrated a stretchable lithium-ion battery can power their innovative stretchable electronics. The stretchable electronic devices now could be used anywhere, including inside the human body, they say, powering implantable electronics that could monitor anything from brain waves to heart activity. They say that they have demonstrated a battery that powers a commercial light-emitting diode even when stretched, folded, twisted, and mounted on a human elbow. The battery can work for eight to nine hours before needing recharging, which can be done wirelessly.

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