Board-Level Electronics
Scientists Demonstrate Electrical Properties of Topological Insulators
Posted in News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Power Management on Tuesday, 01 April 2014
Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have demonstrated for the first time that one can electrically access the remarkable properties predicted for a topological insulator (TI). They used a ferromagnetic metal/tunnel barrier contact as a voltage probe to detect the spin polarization created in the topologically protected surface states when an unpolarized bias current is applied. This accomplishment identifies a successful electrical approach that provides direct access to the TI surface state spin system, significantly advances our fundamental understanding of this new quantum state, and enables utilization of the remarkable properties these materials offer for future technological applications.
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Bending Light with a Tiny Chip
Posted in News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Optical Components, Optics, Photonics on Tuesday, 01 April 2014
Imagine that you are in a meeting with coworkers or at a gathering of friends. You pull out your cell phone to show a presentation or a video on YouTube. But you don't use the tiny screen; your phone projects a bright, clear image onto a wall or a big screen. Such a technology may be on its way, thanks to a new light-bending silicon chip developed by researchers at Caltech.
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MELF Resistor Series
Posted in Products, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics, Thermal Management on Wednesday, 01 January 2014
Stackpole Electronics Inc., Raleigh, NC, announces that its surface mount metal film MELFs, the MLF and MLFM Series offers cooler operating temperatures at full rated power. The cylindrical shape provides a termination that is far more thermally efficient than comparable size flat chip resistors. They are ideally suited for medical instrumentation, monitoring, and test equipment.
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Printing Inkjet-Based Circuits
Posted in News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics on Wednesday, 13 November 2013
A team of researchers from Georgia Tech, the University of Tokyo, and Microsoft Research have developed a novel method to rapidly and inexpensively make electrical circuits by printing them with commodity inkjet printers and off-the-shelf materials. For about $300 in equipment costs, anyone can produce working electrical circuits in the 60 seconds it takes to print them.
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High Voltage Magnetics
Posted in Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Products, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics on Tuesday, 01 October 2013
Datatronics Romoland, Inc., Menifee, CA, says its 4283-1200 Series of hi-voltage flyback transformers, offering primary- to-secondary isolation of up to 7 KVdc, is ideal for applications requiring a high-voltage, low-power signal. Typical applications include line and portable medical devices such as defibrillators, imaging diagnostic equipment, brain therapy devices, and more. MD&M Minn, Booth 1710
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Sensor Assembly Solutions
Posted in Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Products, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics on Tuesday, 01 October 2013
Honeywell Sensing and Control, Golden Valley, MN, launched new customizable pressure and thermal sensor solutions, including modules with multiple sensors. Heaters, magnetic, magneto-resistive, infrared, optical, pressure, thermal, and humidity options are all available for customization. MD&M Minn, Booth 1030
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Circuit Protection Critical to Safeguarding Both Medical Devices and Patients’ Health
Posted in Custom & Contract Manufacturing, Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Features, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics, Power Management, Thermal Management on Sunday, 01 September 2013
Agrowing array of electronic devices are available to healthcare providers, patients, and their families, including glucose meters, blood pressure monitors, automated external defibrillators (AEDs), and many others. To ensure safe, reliable performance of these devices, their designers must factor in circuit protection requirements from the earliest stages of the circuit design process. For example, a seemingly minor electrostatic discharge could easily render a portable medical device useless if it’s not properly protected, exposing the patient to the danger of misleading (or no) readings and the device’s manufacturer to legal liability if inaccurate results lead to improper treatment.
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