Electronic Components
New Supercapacitor Could Make Structural Energy Storage A Reality
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Power Management, Energy Storage, Energy, Semiconductors & ICs, News on Tuesday, 10 June 2014
Imagine a future in which our electrical gadgets are no longer limited by plugs and external power sources. This intriguing prospect is one of the reasons for the current interest in building the capacity to store electrical energy directly into a wide range of products, such as a laptop whose casing serves as its battery, or an electric car powered by energy stored in its chassis, or a home where the dry wall and siding store the electricity that runs the lights and appliances. It also makes the small, dull grey wafers that graduate student Andrew Westover and Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Cary Pint have made in Vanderbilt's Nanomaterials and Energy Devices Laboratory far more important than their nondescript appearance suggests.
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New Way To Make Sheets Of Graphene Discovered
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Materials, Coatings & Adhesives, Solar Power, Energy, Semiconductors & ICs, News on Tuesday, 10 June 2014
Graphene's promise as a material for new kinds of electronic devices, among other uses, has led researchers around the world to study the material in search of new applications. But one of the biggest limitations to wider use of the strong, lightweight, highly conductive material has been the hurdle of fabrication on an industrial scale.
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Implantable Electronic Gripping Devices
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Materials, Composites, Plastics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, News, MDB on Wednesday, 04 June 2014
A team of scientists from The University of Texas, Dallas, along with colleagues at the University of Tokyo, Japan, have created biologically adaptive transistor devices that have the ability to become soft when implanted inside the body yet can reshape themselves and deploy to grip 3D objects, such as large tissues, nerves, and blood vessels.
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Introducing the Bionic Man
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Materials, Ceramics, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites, Metals, Plastics, Sensors, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Surgical Robotics/Instruments, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Drug Delivery & Fluid Handling, Diagnostics, Orthopedics, News, MDB on Wednesday, 04 June 2014
The NIH’s Bionic Man site helps viewers visually explore some of the latest bioengineering creations from research funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. From prosthetics to artificial kidneys, these technologies are changing lives now and in the future.
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Chip Could Eliminate Need for Magnets in Imaging
Posted in Electronic Components, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Imaging, Medical, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Tuesday, 03 June 2014
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD, say that they have built and demonstrated a chip-scale device that both produces and detects a specialized gas used in biomedical analysis and medical imaging. The new microfluidic chip produces polarized (or magnetized) xenon gas and then detects even the faintest magnetic signals from the gas.
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New Algorithms Enable Self-Assembling, Printable Robots
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Motion Control, Motors & Drives, Power Transmission, Sensors, Software, Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Mathematical/Scientific Software, Machinery & Automation, Robotics, News on Friday, 30 May 2014
In two new papers, MIT researchers demonstrate the promise of printable robotic components that, when heated, automatically fold into prescribed three-dimensional configurations.

One paper describes a system that takes a digital specification of a 3-D shape — such as a computer-aided design, or CAD, file — and generates the 2-D patterns that would enable a piece of plastic to reproduce it through self-folding.

The other paper explains how to build electrical components from self-folding laser-cut materials. The researchers present designs for resistors, inductors, and capacitors, as well as sensors and actuators — the electromechanical “muscles” that enable robots’ movements.

“We have this big dream of the hardware compiler, where you can specify, ‘I want a robot that will play with my cat,’ or ‘I want a robot that will clean the floor,’ and from this high-level specification, you actually generate a working device,” said Daniela Rus, the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.

Source

Also: Learn about Self-Assembling, Flexible, Pre-Ceramic Composite Preforms.
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New Rotary Sensor Keeps Conveyor Belts Running Smoothly
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Photonics, Optics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Industrial Controls & Automation, Consumer Product Manufacturing, Sensors, Test & Measurement, Measuring Instruments, News on Wednesday, 28 May 2014
Rotary sensors can help determine the position of a moveable body in relation to an axis. They are essential to the smooth running of car engines in the automotive industry, for example. In factories, goods and products are transported from one processing station to the next via conveyor belt. For the transfer from one belt to the next to run smoothly, it must take place precisely at a specific position, which means knowing the relative position of objects on the conveyor belts as they move towards each other. This can be determined from the angle of rotation, which refers to the position of a moveable body to an axis.
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