Electronic Components
Hospital-Grade Standards for Power Cords and Other Power System Components for Global Markets
Posted in Features, Electronic Components, Power Management, Power Supplies, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs on Thursday, 01 January 2015
While a number of countries have standards in regards to overall medical equipment, a few countries have related component requirements (e.g. plugs and cords). For the countries that do have hospital-grade or medical application standards on components, it is important to know what the requirements are so as to comply with that country or region’s rules.
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3D-Printed Contact Lens Combines Plastics and Electronics
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Implants & Prosthetics on Thursday, 18 December 2014
An interdisciplinary team of engineers at Princeton University has embedded tiny light-emitting diodes (LEDs) into a standard contact lens, allowing the device to project beams of colored light. While the lens is not designed for actual use, especially since it requires an external power supply, the team created the device to demonstrate its ability to 3D print electronics into complex shapes and materials.
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Wireless Brain Sensing Untethers Subjects
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Diagnostics, Implants & Prosthetics, Patient Monitoring, Sensors on Wednesday, 17 December 2014
Scientists at Brown University, Providence, RI, say that a new wireless brain-sensing system will allow them to acquire high-fidelity neural data to advance neuroscience that cannot be accomplished with current sensors that tie subjects to cabled computer connections for analysis. Their results show that the technology transmitted data-rich, neuroscientifically meaningful signals from animal models as they slept, woke, and exercised.
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Developing a Sonar-Assisted Device for the Blind
Posted in News, Wireless, Electronic Components, Electronics, Patient Monitoring on Thursday, 11 December 2014
At Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, a biology professor researching echolocation in bats teamed up with an associate professor of computer science and an interdisciplinary team of students to develop a device that can help the visually impaired navigate better. Their research focused on developing a device that could be worn like a watch by a visually-impaired person as a supplement to other aids like a cane or guide dog.
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Researchers Develop a Way to Control Material with Voltage
Posted in News, Batteries, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Power Management, Metals on Thursday, 04 December 2014
A new way of switching the magnetic properties of a material using just a small applied voltage, developed by researchers at MIT and collaborators elsewhere, could signal the beginning of a new family of materials with a variety of switchable properties. The technique could ultimately be used to control properties other than magnetism, including reflectivity or thermal conductivity. The first application of the new finding is likely to be a new kind of memory chip that requires no power to maintain data once it’s written, drastically lowering its overall power needs. This could be especially useful for mobile devices, where battery life is often a major limitation.
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Garnet Ceramics Could Be the Key to High-Energy Lithium Batteries
Posted in News, Batteries, Electronic Components, Power Management, Energy Efficiency, Ceramics on Thursday, 04 December 2014
Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered exceptional properties in a garnet material that could enable development of higher-energy battery designs. The ORNL-led team used scanning transmission electron microscopy to take an atomic-level look at a cubic garnet material called LLZO. The researchers found the material to be highly stable in a range of aqueous environments, making the compound a promising component in new battery configurations.
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Harvesting Energy for Medical Implants
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Power Supplies, Implants & Prosthetics on Monday, 01 December 2014
Scientists at the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have demonstrated a new technique for harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations of the environment and converting it into electricity. They explain that energy harvesters are needed, for example, in wireless self-powered sensors and medical implants, such as pacemakers, where they could ultimately replace batteries.
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