Electronic Components
Pomegranate Inspires Battery Design
Posted in Batteries, Electronic Components, Power Supplies, Electronics, Medical, News, MDB on Monday, 24 February 2014
Researchers at Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has invented an electrode designed like a pomegranate with silicon nanoparticles clustered like seeds in a tough carbon rind, that they say overcomes several obstacles to using silicon for a new generation of lithium-ion batteries.
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Bionic Hand Allows Amputee Real-Time Sense of Touch
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, News, MDB on Thursday, 13 February 2014
A team of researchers and engineers at the Swiss Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Center for Neuroprosthetics and SSSA (Italy) have developed a revolutionary sensory feedback that allowed an amputee named Dennis Aabo Sørensen to feel sensory-rich information, in real-time, using a prosthetic hand wired to nerves in his upper arm.
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Self-Aligning Wires for Nanoelectronics
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Medical, Nanotechnology, News, MDB on Friday, 07 February 2014
Miniaturization in microelectronics is beginning to reach its physical limits, say researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, who are seeking new methods for device fabrication. They have discovered that one method may be the DNA origami technique in which individual strands of the biomolecule self-assemble into arbitrarily shaped nanostructures.
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Electronics Thin Enough to Wrap Around Single Hair
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Friday, 10 January 2014
Researchers at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, a leading technology university, say they have developed electronic components that are so thin and flexible they can even be wrapped around a single hair without damaging the electronics. This may open up new possibilities for ultra-thin, transparent sensors, including to create smart contact lenses, which could be used to measure intraocular pressure to test for glaucoma, among other uses. The new thin-film transistors adhere to a wide range of surfaces and adapt perfectly, they say.
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2D Materials for Printable Electronics
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Photonics, Medical, News, MDB on Tuesday, 07 January 2014
A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore has successfully developed a method to chemically exfoliate molybdenum disulfide crystals into high quality monolayer flakes, with a higher yield and larger flake size than current methods. These flakes can then be made into a printable solution, which can be applied in printable photonics and electronics.
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Electronic Bodysuit Could Treat Neurologically Impaired
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Medical, Drug Delivery & Fluid Handling, Features, MDB on Wednesday, 01 January 2014
Aspecially-designed elastic bodysuit covered with electrodes, which was designed at Stockholm’s KTH Royal Institute of Technology, in collaboration with health care and business partners, could be used to help those suffering with brain damage or neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease.
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Medical Device Components 2.0: The Trend Towards a Healthier, PVC-Free Alternative
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Materials, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites, Metals, Plastics, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs, Medical, Features, MDB on Wednesday, 01 January 2014
We’ve all learned in Wire & Cable 101 that poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) reigns supreme for its low cost, high temperature ranges, and multipurpose capabilities. PVC can be easily manipulated using various additives which contain halogens and phthalates to enhance certain properties like flame resistance, temperature performance, or flexibility. However, when choosing wire and cable components for medical devices, is it time for manufacturers to pick up a new textbook that takes into account the various negative consequences of PVC?
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