Electronic Components
Scientists Demonstrate Electrical Properties of Topological Insulators
Posted in News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Power Management on Tuesday, 01 April 2014
Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have demonstrated for the first time that one can electrically access the remarkable properties predicted for a topological insulator (TI). They used a ferromagnetic metal/tunnel barrier contact as a voltage probe to detect the spin polarization created in the topologically protected surface states when an unpolarized bias current is applied. This accomplishment identifies a successful electrical approach that provides direct access to the TI surface state spin system, significantly advances our fundamental understanding of this new quantum state, and enables utilization of the remarkable properties these materials offer for future technological applications.
Bending Light with a Tiny Chip
Posted in News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Optical Components, Optics, Photonics on Tuesday, 01 April 2014
Imagine that you are in a meeting with coworkers or at a gathering of friends. You pull out your cell phone to show a presentation or a video on YouTube. But you don't use the tiny screen; your phone projects a bright, clear image onto a wall or a big screen. Such a technology may be on its way, thanks to a new light-bending silicon chip developed by researchers at Caltech.
A Graphene-Metal Sandwich Could Improve Electronics
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Thermal Management, Coatings & Adhesives, Metals on Thursday, 20 March 2014
Researchers have discovered that creating a graphene-copper-graphene “sandwich” enhances copper’s heat conducting properties, which could help in shrinking electronics. Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Manchester, UK, in collaboration, found that adding a layer of graphene, a one-atom thick material on each side of a copper film increased heat conducting properties by up to 24 percent.
Pomegranate Inspires Battery Design
Posted in News, Batteries, Electronic Components, Electronics, Power Supplies on Monday, 24 February 2014
Researchers at Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has invented an electrode designed like a pomegranate with silicon nanoparticles clustered like seeds in a tough carbon rind, that they say overcomes several obstacles to using silicon for a new generation of lithium-ion batteries.
Bionic Hand Allows Amputee Real-Time Sense of Touch
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Implants & Prosthetics on Thursday, 13 February 2014
A team of researchers and engineers at the Swiss Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Center for Neuroprosthetics and SSSA (Italy) have developed a revolutionary sensory feedback that allowed an amputee named Dennis Aabo Sørensen to feel sensory-rich information, in real-time, using a prosthetic hand wired to nerves in his upper arm.
Self-Aligning Wires for Nanoelectronics
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics on Friday, 07 February 2014
Miniaturization in microelectronics is beginning to reach its physical limits, say researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, who are seeking new methods for device fabrication. They have discovered that one method may be the DNA origami technique in which individual strands of the biomolecule self-assemble into arbitrarily shaped nanostructures.
Electronics Thin Enough to Wrap Around Single Hair
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Diagnostics, Implants & Prosthetics, Patient Monitoring on Friday, 10 January 2014
Researchers at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, a leading technology university, say they have developed electronic components that are so thin and flexible they can even be wrapped around a single hair without damaging the electronics. This may open up new possibilities for ultra-thin, transparent sensors, including to create smart contact lenses, which could be used to measure intraocular pressure to test for glaucoma, among other uses. The new thin-film transistors adhere to a wide range of surfaces and adapt perfectly, they say.

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