Electronics
Edible Supercapacitors Could Replace Endoscopies
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Diagnostics, Implants & Prosthetics, Patient Monitoring on Wednesday, 18 May 2016
Engineers at Arizona State University (ASU), Tempe, have created an edible supercapacitor that, they say, can wipe out E. coli or power a camera from inside the body. Using edible foodstuffs like activated charcoal, gold leaf, seaweed, egg white, cheese, gelatin, and barbecue sauce, which can store and conduct electricity, and sandwiching them together, the researchers created supercapacitors that can store electrical energy temporarily.
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3D Printing a Perfectly Fitting Prosthetic Socket
Posted in News, Computers, Electronics, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Implants & Prosthetics, Orthopedics, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy on Tuesday, 17 May 2016
A masters student in product development at the School of Engineering at Lund University, Sweden, Emelie Strömshed,has developed a step-by-step process to combine prosthetic arm socket computer-aided design (CAD) data with 3D scan data of a patient’s residual limbs to create perfectly fitting 3D-printed prosthetic arm sockets.
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Report Details Possible Healthcare Cybersecurity Threats
Posted in News, Electronics, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs on Monday, 09 May 2016
Independent Security Evaluators, Baltimore, MD, has compiled a report available online that details its research in investigating a variety of hospital and healthcare-related infrastructures and systems, identifying industry-specific pitfalls and shortcomings, and creating a blueprint for how entities in the space can improve their security posture by the most effective means.
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Glucose to Power Pacemakers
Posted in News, Batteries, Electronic Components, Electronics, Power Supplies, Implants & Prosthetics, Patient Monitoring on Wednesday, 04 May 2016
Researchers at the Technological Institute of Energy, Valencia, Spain, are working to create a bio-battery that uses blood glucose to produce energy. Such a battery, they say, would cut down on the number of surgical interventions a pacemaker user must undergo.
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Approaching Dissolvable Electronics for Implants
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Implants & Prosthetics, Patient Monitoring on Monday, 02 May 2016
Scientists at the College of Information Science and Electronic Engineering in China are working diligently to create tiny electronic sensors and devices that can be implanted in the body and then dissolve seemingly without a trace. They have tested several biodegradable materials, including DNA, proteins, and metals, for making transient electronics. Edging closer, their newest dissolvable device is composed of egg proteins, magnesium, and tungsten.
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High-Bandwidth, Wide Field-of-View, Ultra-Sensitive, Radiation-Hardened, Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR) Receiver
Posted in Briefs, Electronics on Saturday, 30 April 2016
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland Every LiDAR design faces the classic balancing act of signal versus noise. In order to maximize the range of a LiDAR, a receiver must amplify fractions of a micro-amp of photo current into a usable range for signal processing to occur, but without adding significant amounts of noise. Additionally, LiDAR receiver designs must exhibit very wide dynamic ranges because of the uncertainty in return signal amplitude. Meeting all these requirements in a small size, weight, and power form factor while keeping costs low is a major challenge.
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Magnetometer for Vectorized Field Sensing via Zero-Field, Spin-Dependent Recombination in Silicon Carbide Microelectronics
Posted in Briefs, Electronics on Saturday, 30 April 2016
This self-calibrating, solid-state-based magnetometer is intended for miniaturized applications in high-temperature and high-radiation environments. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California The proposed technology involves the sensitive detection of magnetic fields using the zero-field, spin-dependent recombination (SDR) phenomenon that naturally arises from atomic-scale, deep-level defects intrinsic to silicon carbide (SiC) microelectronics. The SDR phenomenon enables the fabrication of SiC-based magnetic field sensing diodes that are ideal for the development of miniaturized and purely electrical-based magnetometers.
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