Electronics
MIDR03M Series 3 WattConverter
Posted in Power Supplies, Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Medical, Products, MDB on Thursday, 01 January 2015
PIK Power, Inc., Marlborough, CT, offers a large standard range of MINMAX high isolation converters with models ranging from 1 to 10W. Products with fully regulated or unregulated output voltages are available. The I/O-isolation voltage, depending on model, is rated from 3000 to 4200VACrms reinforced isolation. All products are approved to medical safety standards cUL/UL/IEC/EN 60601-1 3rd edition and cUL/UL/IEC/EN 60950-1.
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SlimStack™ SSB6 SMT Micro Connectors
Posted in Electronic Components, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Joining & Assembly, Medical, MEMs, Products, MDB on Thursday, 01 January 2015
Molex, Inc., Lisle, IL, announces the launch of its new SlimStack™ SSB6 SMT microminiature board-to-board connectors. With an ultra-low profile (0.35 mm pitch) and compact size (0.60 mm height x 2.00 mm width, when mated), SlimStack SSB6 connectors are ideal for saving space in the compact packaging of a wide range of surgical, therapeutic, and monitoring medical devices.
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Recording Speedy Electrons in Silicon
Posted in Electronics, Medical, Diagnostics, Semiconductors & ICs, News, MDB on Wednesday, 24 December 2014
An international team of physicists and chemists based at the University of California at Berkeley has, for the first time, recorded the action of silicon electrons becoming freed from their atomic shells using attosecond pulses of soft X-ray light lasting only a few billionths of a billionth of a second.These mobile electrons make the semiconductor material conductive so that an applied voltage results in a flowing current.
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3D-Printed Contact Lens Combines Plastics and Electronics
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, News, MDB on Thursday, 18 December 2014
An interdisciplinary team of engineers at Princeton University has embedded tiny light-emitting diodes (LEDs) into a standard contact lens, allowing the device to project beams of colored light. While the lens is not designed for actual use, especially since it requires an external power supply, the team created the device to demonstrate its ability to 3D print electronics into complex shapes and materials.
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Wireless Brain Sensing Untethers Subjects
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Sensors, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Wednesday, 17 December 2014
Scientists at Brown University, Providence, RI, say that a new wireless brain-sensing system will allow them to acquire high-fidelity neural data to advance neuroscience that cannot be accomplished with current sensors that tie subjects to cabled computer connections for analysis. Their results show that the technology transmitted data-rich, neuroscientifically meaningful signals from animal models as they slept, woke, and exercised.
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Developing a Sonar-Assisted Device for the Blind
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Wireless, News, MDB on Thursday, 11 December 2014
At Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, a biology professor researching echolocation in bats teamed up with an associate professor of computer science and an interdisciplinary team of students to develop a device that can help the visually impaired navigate better. Their research focused on developing a device that could be worn like a watch by a visually-impaired person as a supplement to other aids like a cane or guide dog.
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Heat-Conducting Plastic Dissipates Ten Times Better
Posted in Thermal Management, Electronics, Materials, Composites, Plastics, Medical, News, MDB on Monday, 08 December 2014
Engineers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, have developed a plastic blend that, they say, can dissipate heat up to 10 times better than its conventional counterparts. While plastics are inexpensive, lightweight, and flexible, they tend to restrict the flow of heat, so their use has been limited in technologies like computers, smartphones, and other devices. This new research could lead to light, versatile, metal-replacement materials for more powerful electronics.
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