Electronics

Lasers May Stabilize Future Electronics

Nearly all electronics require oscillators that create precise frequencies, which have, until now, relied upon quartz crystals to provide a frequency reference, like a tuning fork used to tune a piano. However, future high-end electronics will require references beyond the performance of quartz, say scientists at California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

Posted in: MDB, News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Medical, Lasers & Laser Systems

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Agile Aperture Antenna Tested on Aircraft to Maintain Satellite Connection

Two of Georgia Tech's software-defined, electronically reconfigurable Agile Aperture Antennas (A3) were demonstrated in an aircraft during flight tests. The low-power devices can change beam directions in a thousandth of a second. One device, looking up, maintained a satellite data connection as the aircraft changed headings, banked and rolled, while the other antenna looked down to track electromagnetic emitters on the ground.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Aviation, Communications, Wireless, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Power Management, Antennas, RF & Microwave Electronics, Software, Measuring Instruments, Test & Measurement

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Creating Soft Robotics with a Sewing Machine

New stretchable technologies and soft robotics being explored by engineers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, could lead to innovations such as robots with human-like sensory skin and synthetic muscles, as well as wearable electronics. But to do so, they say, you would need a low-cost, highly stretchable electrical conductor to interconnect sensors and other components.

Posted in: MDB, News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials, Metals, Plastics, Diagnostics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy

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Developing World's First Memory Restoration Device

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA, were awarded up to $2.5 million to develop an implantable neural device with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain to help restore memory from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Posted in: MDB, News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Diagnostics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Patient Monitoring

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Nano-Pixels Promise Flexible, High-Res Displays

A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometers across. The "nano-pixels" could pave the way for extremely high-resolution and low-energy thin, flexible displays for applications such as 'smart' glasses, synthetic retinas, and foldable screens.Oxford University scientists explored the link between the electrical and optical properties of phase change materials (materials that can change from an amorphous to a crystalline state). By sandwiching a seven=nanometer-thick layer of a phase change material (GST) between two layers of a transparent electrode, the team found that they could use a tiny current to 'draw' images within the sandwich "stack."Initially still images were created using an atomic force microscope, but the researchers went on to demonstrate that such tiny "stacks" can be turned into prototype pixel-like devices. These 'nano-pixels' – just 300 by 300 nanometers in size – can be electrically switched 'on and off' at will, creating the colored dots that would form the building blocks of an extremely high-resolution display technology.SourceAlso: Learn about Slot-Sampled Optical PPM Demodulation.

Posted in: News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Imaging, Materials, Nanotechnology, Semiconductors & ICs

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Shrinking the Gap in Nanowire Technology

A team of engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using Shrinky Dinks material, a polystyrene that shrinks under high heat, to close the gap between nanowires in an array to make them useful for high-performance electronics applications. The group published its technique in the journal, Nano Letters.

Posted in: MDB, News, Electronics, Materials, Metals, Plastics, Medical, Nanotechnology

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Hybrid Circuit Uses Nanotube Transistors

A group of engineers at the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, Los Angeles, say that they are developing a flexible, energy-efficient hybrid circuit combining carbon nanotube thin film transistors with other thin film transistors. This hybrid, they say, could take the place of silicon as the traditional transistor material used in electronic chips, since carbon nanotubes are more transparent, flexible, and can be processed at a lower cost.

Posted in: MDB, News, Electronics, Composites, Materials, Diagnostics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Nanotechnology

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