Electronics
From the Editor: April
Posted in Electronics, Imaging, Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE), Surgical Robotics/Instruments, Medical, Features, MDB on Monday, 01 April 2013

It’s Showtime!

At the time of this writing I am just back from MD&M West in Anaheim. What a pleasure to meet with representatives from so many of the companies who have graced these pages and more still to come. This, coming right after BIOS/Photonics West in San Francisco, officially kicks off the medical device conference season, which culminates with BIOMEDevice in San Jose in December.
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Chroma Sync Hipot Tester
Posted in Manufacturing & Prototyping, Electronics, Power Supplies, Power Management, Medical, Products, MDB on Monday, 01 April 2013
Chroma Systems Solutions, Inc., Foothill Ranch, CA, a leading provider of electrical power test equipment and systems, announces its new 19020 Series Multichannel Hipot tester, which allows one unit to perform 10 channel sync output and measurements at the same time, and conduct tests on a maximum of 100 devices simultaneously, increasing regulatory test efficiency and productivity. BIOMEDevice Booth 922
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Front End Power Supplies
Posted in Manufacturing & Prototyping, Electronics, Power Supplies, Medical, Products, MDB on Monday, 01 April 2013
TDK Corp., San Diego, CA, expands its Lambda HFE1600 range of 1.6kW high-density, front end power supplies with the addition of a 32V model. The HFE1600-32 operates from a universal 85 to 265Vac input. In addition to the 32V model, supplies are available with other voltages, and each HFE1600 supply has two variable-speed cooling fans and can operate in temperatures ranging from -10°C to +70°C. BIOMEDevice Booth 1024
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Polarized Nano Connector Line
Posted in Manufacturing & Prototyping, Electronics, Electronic Components, Medical, Products, MDB on Monday, 01 April 2013
Omnetics Connector Corp., Minneapolis, MN, offers a new Polarized Nano connector line, the PZN series of ultra-miniature connectors using military style pin and socket designs to provide uninterrupted electrical connections for portable applications. PZN connector contact spacing is set at 25 one thousandths of an inch. Medical designers can use the PZN format to squeeze more electronics into smaller devices. Other applications include drive circuits for handheld laser and orthopedic tools.
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Medical Devices to Be Affected by RoHS Directive in 2014
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs, Medical, News, MDB on Monday, 18 March 2013
In addition to the Chemicals Regulation REACH (Regulation concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical substances), medical devices will soon have to comply with the European RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances) Directive on the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment. This affects US exports to the EU, the EFTA countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway), Switzerland, and Turkey. The current scope of products will expand until the use of the RoHs 6 hazardous substances: lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, and the flame retardants PBB and PBDE, will be essentially banned in all electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) up to 1,000 Volts AC, 1,500 volts DC sold in the EU.

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Scaling Up Production of Graphene Micro-Supercapacitors
Posted in Batteries, Electronic Components, Board-Level Electronics, Power Supplies, Electronics, Power Management, Medical, News, MDB on Tuesday, 12 March 2013
The demand for ever-smaller electronic devices has led to the miniaturization of a variety of technologies, but energy-storage units, such as batteries and capacitors, have lagged behind. Now, researchers at UCLA say that they have developed an innovative technique using a DVD burner to fabricate micro-scale graphene-based supercapacitors, which can charge and discharge a hundred to a thousand times faster than standard batteries. These micro-supercapacitors, made from a one-atom–thick layer of graphitic carbon, can be easily manufactured and readily integrated into small devices such as next-generation pacemakers, they say.

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New Method of Controlling Tiny Devices
Posted in Electronics, Power Management, Medical, News, MDB on Wednesday, 06 March 2013
Electromagnetic devices all require an electric current to create the magnetic fields that allow them to function. But as devices become smaller, being able to efficiently deliver a current to create magnetic fields becomes more difficult. Researchers at UCLA say that they have developed a method to switch tiny magnetic fields on and off with an electric field, instead of the traditional approach of running a current through a wire, which they say could lead to big changes in storing digital information and powering motors in small hand-held devices.

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