Electronics
Heat-Conducting Plastic Dissipates Ten Times Better
Posted in News, Electronics, Thermal Management, Composites, Plastics on Monday, 08 December 2014
Engineers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, have developed a plastic blend that, they say, can dissipate heat up to 10 times better than its conventional counterparts. While plastics are inexpensive, lightweight, and flexible, they tend to restrict the flow of heat, so their use has been limited in technologies like computers, smartphones, and other devices. This new research could lead to light, versatile, metal-replacement materials for more powerful electronics.
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Printing Electrical Components on Paper
Posted in News, Electronics, Diagnostics, Drug Delivery & Fluid Handling, Patient Monitoring on Friday, 05 December 2014
Seeking a way to print technology, improve device portability, and lower the cost of electronics, a team of engineers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, led by Assistant Professor Anming Hu, has discovered a way to print circuits on paper.
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NASA's Hot 100 Technologies: Electrical/Electronics
Posted in Articles, Techs for License, Electronics on Monday, 01 December 2014

High-Field Superconducting Magnets

This technology represents a significant improvement over commercial state-of-the-art magnets. These superconducting magnets are very versatile and can be used in a number of applications requiring magnetic fields at low temperature, such as in MRI machines, mass spectrometers, and particle accelerators.
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Trimming Wiring Harnesses Becomes Design Focus
Posted in Articles, Electronics on Monday, 01 December 2014
Wires and cables help design teams add electronic features and functions, but networks and wiring harnesses add a fair amount of weight while their connections can be the cause of failures. That’s prompting developers to examine ways to reduce the size and weight of wires and cables. Read more at http://articles.sae.org/13419.
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Coating Batteries for Child Safety
Posted in News, Batteries, Electronics on Thursday, 06 November 2014
Each year, nearly 4,000 children go to emergency rooms after swallowing button batteries, which can cause burns that damage the esophagus, tears in the digestive tract, and in some cases, even death. To help prevent such injuries, researchers at MIT, Cambridge, MA, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, have devised a new way to coat batteries with a special material that prevents them from conducting electricity after being swallowed.
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Sound-Powered Medical Implants
Posted in News, Electronics, Power Supplies, Implants & Prosthetics, Patient Monitoring on Wednesday, 29 October 2014
Engineers at Stanford University are working on a new generation of medical devices that would be planted deep inside the body to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain. But in order to do so, they need to develop a way to provide electric power to those implants. Using wires or batteries to deliver power generally makes implants too big, too clumsy, or both, they say.
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Researchers Develop Thinnest Electric Generator
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Power Management, Metals, Sensors on Friday, 17 October 2014
Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology made the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), resulting in a unique electric generator and mechanosensation devices that are optically transparent, extremely light, and very bendable and stretchable.

“This material—just a single layer of atoms—could be made as a wearable device, perhaps integrated into clothing, to convert energy from your body movement to electricity and power wearable sensors or medical devices, or perhaps supply enough energy to charge your cell phone in your pocket,” says James Hone, professor of mechanical engineering at Columbia and co-leader of the research.

Hone’s team placed thin flakes of MoS2 on flexible plastic substrates and determined how their crystal lattices were oriented using optical techniques. They then patterned metal electrodes onto the flakes. In research done at Georgia Tech, a group led by Zhong Lin Wang, Regents’ Professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Materials Science and Engineering, installed measurement electrodes on the samples provided by Hone’s group, then measured current flows as the samples were mechanically deformed. They monitored the conversion of mechanical to electrical energy, and observed voltage and current outputs.

Ultimately, Zhong Lin Wang notes, the research could lead to complete atomic-thick nanosystems that are self-powered by harvesting mechanical energy from the environment. This study also reveals the piezotronic effect in two-dimensional materials for the first time, which greatly expands the application of layered materials for human-machine interfacing, robotics, MEMS, and active flexible electronics.

Source Also: Learn more about a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Transducer System.
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