Electronics
New Material for Thin, Light-Weight Electronics
Posted in Electronics, Medical, News, MDB on Friday, 17 January 2014
Scientists from SLAC, Stanford University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Advanced Light Source, grew sheets of an exotic material in a single atomic layer and measured its electronic structure for the first time. They discovered it’s a natural fit for making thin, flexible light-based electronics.
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Cyborgs Are Already Here
Posted in Electronics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, News, MDB on Thursday, 16 January 2014
Cyborgs that combine machine systems with living organisms to have extraordinary abilities are already a reality say researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). This is especially true with medical implant technology.
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Electronics Thin Enough to Wrap Around Single Hair
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Friday, 10 January 2014
Researchers at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, a leading technology university, say they have developed electronic components that are so thin and flexible they can even be wrapped around a single hair without damaging the electronics. This may open up new possibilities for ultra-thin, transparent sensors, including to create smart contact lenses, which could be used to measure intraocular pressure to test for glaucoma, among other uses. The new thin-film transistors adhere to a wide range of surfaces and adapt perfectly, they say.
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2D Materials for Printable Electronics
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Photonics, Medical, News, MDB on Tuesday, 07 January 2014
A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore has successfully developed a method to chemically exfoliate molybdenum disulfide crystals into high quality monolayer flakes, with a higher yield and larger flake size than current methods. These flakes can then be made into a printable solution, which can be applied in printable photonics and electronics.
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Micro-Muscle Breakthrough
Posted in Electronics, Motion Control, Medical, News, MDB on Friday, 03 January 2014
While vanadium dioxide is already known for its ability to change size, shape, and physical identity, a team of researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory say that super strength can now be added to that list of attributes. They demonstrated a micro-sized robotic torsional muscle/motor made from vanadium dioxide, which for its size is a thousand times more powerful than a human muscle, was able to catapult objects 50 times heavier than itself over a distance five times its length within 60 milliseconds.
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Electronic Bodysuit Could Treat Neurologically Impaired
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Medical, Drug Delivery & Fluid Handling, Features, MDB on Wednesday, 01 January 2014
Aspecially-designed elastic bodysuit covered with electrodes, which was designed at Stockholm’s KTH Royal Institute of Technology, in collaboration with health care and business partners, could be used to help those suffering with brain damage or neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease.
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Medical Device Components 2.0: The Trend Towards a Healthier, PVC-Free Alternative
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Materials, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites, Metals, Plastics, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs, Medical, Features, MDB on Wednesday, 01 January 2014
We’ve all learned in Wire & Cable 101 that poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) reigns supreme for its low cost, high temperature ranges, and multipurpose capabilities. PVC can be easily manipulated using various additives which contain halogens and phthalates to enhance certain properties like flame resistance, temperature performance, or flexibility. However, when choosing wire and cable components for medical devices, is it time for manufacturers to pick up a new textbook that takes into account the various negative consequences of PVC?
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