Electronics
Treating PTSD with Removable Brain Implant
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, News on Monday, 23 June 2014
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently received $5.6 million from the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop an implantable neural interface that can record and stimulate neurons within the brain to treat neuropsychiatric disorders. The technology will help doctors to better understand and treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury, chronic pain, and other conditions.
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Printing Electronic Circuits and Sensors Directly onto 3D Surfaces
Posted in Electronic Components, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Medical, News, MDB on Tuesday, 17 June 2014
Digital printing technologies play an important role in microelectronics, microsystems engineering, and sensor systems. Recently, scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM in Bremen, Germany, have discovered that they can use various printing methods to produce electronic components and sensors. The tiny resistors, transistors, circuit paths, and capacitors are first designed on screen and then printed directly onto 2Dand 3D substrates. Instead of paper inks, they are using “functional inks,” electronic materials in liquid or paste form.
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Students Design Defibrillator Vest
Posted in Electronics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Tuesday, 10 June 2014
A team of biomedical engineering students at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, designed a lightweight, easy-to-conceal shirt-like garment to deliver life-saving shocks to patients experiencing serious heart problems. The students say their design improves upon a wearable defibrillator system that is already in use. 
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Implantable Electronic Gripping Devices
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Materials, Composites, Plastics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, News, MDB on Wednesday, 04 June 2014
A team of scientists from The University of Texas, Dallas, along with colleagues at the University of Tokyo, Japan, have created biologically adaptive transistor devices that have the ability to become soft when implanted inside the body yet can reshape themselves and deploy to grip 3D objects, such as large tissues, nerves, and blood vessels.
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Introducing the Bionic Man
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Materials, Ceramics, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites, Metals, Plastics, Sensors, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Surgical Robotics/Instruments, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Drug Delivery & Fluid Handling, Diagnostics, Orthopedics, News, MDB on Wednesday, 04 June 2014
The NIH’s Bionic Man site helps viewers visually explore some of the latest bioengineering creations from research funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. From prosthetics to artificial kidneys, these technologies are changing lives now and in the future.
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Chip Could Eliminate Need for Magnets in Imaging
Posted in Electronic Components, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Imaging, Medical, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Tuesday, 03 June 2014
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD, say that they have built and demonstrated a chip-scale device that both produces and detects a specialized gas used in biomedical analysis and medical imaging. The new microfluidic chip produces polarized (or magnetized) xenon gas and then detects even the faintest magnetic signals from the gas.
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‘Smart’ Peg Tests Palsy Patients’ Dexterity
Posted in Electronics, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Medical, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Thursday, 29 May 2014
While it may look like a game board and users may find it fun to use, there is a serious intent behind a device created by engineering students at Rice University, Houston, TX, to test the abilities of cerebral palsy patients. The DeXcellence platform uses a small peg comfortable enough for a three-year-old to hold. But packed inside are enough electronics to tell a nearby computer, tablet, or other Bluetooth-enabled device of how the cylinder is moving in space.
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