Electronics
Battery-Free Connection for 'Internet of Things'
Posted in Electronic Components, Power Supplies, Electronics, Power Management, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Wednesday, 06 August 2014
In the not too distant "Internet of Things" reality, sensors could be embedded in everyday objects to help monitor and track everything from the safety of bridges to the health of your heart. But what’s holding this new reality back is having a way to inexpensively power and connect these devices to the Internet, say engineers at the University of Washington, Seattle.
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Designing a Pure Lithium Anode
Posted in Batteries, Electronic Components, Power Supplies, Electronics, Power Management, Medical, News, MDB on Tuesday, 05 August 2014
The race is on to design smaller, cheaper, and more efficient rechargeable batteries to meet power storage needs. Now, a team of researchers at Stanford University report that they have taken a big step toward designing a pure lithium anode, which, they say, would greatly advance current lithium ion batteries.
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Lasers May Stabilize Future Electronics
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Lasers & Laser Systems, Medical, News, MDB on Thursday, 24 July 2014
Nearly all electronics require oscillators that create precise frequencies, which have, until now, relied upon quartz crystals to provide a frequency reference, like a tuning fork used to tune a piano. However, future high-end electronics will require references beyond the performance of quartz, say scientists at California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
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Agile Aperture Antenna Tested on Aircraft to Maintain Satellite Connection
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Power Management, Software, Test & Measurement, Measuring Instruments, Communications, Wireless, Aerospace, Aviation, RF & Microwave Electronics, Antennas, News on Monday, 21 July 2014
Two of Georgia Tech's software-defined, electronically reconfigurable Agile Aperture Antennas (A3) were demonstrated in an aircraft during flight tests. The low-power devices can change beam directions in a thousandth of a second. One device, looking up, maintained a satellite data connection as the aircraft changed headings, banked and rolled, while the other antenna looked down to track electromagnetic emitters on the ground.
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Creating Soft Robotics with a Sewing Machine
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Materials, Coatings & Adhesives, Metals, Plastics, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Monday, 21 July 2014
New stretchable technologies and soft robotics being explored by engineers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, could lead to innovations such as robots with human-like sensory skin and synthetic muscles, as well as wearable electronics. But to do so, they say, you would need a low-cost, highly stretchable electrical conductor to interconnect sensors and other components.
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Developing World's First Memory Restoration Device
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Wednesday, 16 July 2014
Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA, were awarded up to $2.5 million to develop an implantable neural device with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain to help restore memory from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).
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Nano-Pixels Promise Flexible, High-Res Displays
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Imaging, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Materials, Semiconductors & ICs, Nanotechnology, News on Friday, 11 July 2014
A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometers across. The "nano-pixels" could pave the way for extremely high-resolution and low-energy thin, flexible displays for applications such as 'smart' glasses, synthetic retinas, and foldable screens.

Oxford University scientists explored the link between the electrical and optical properties of phase change materials (materials that can change from an amorphous to a crystalline state). By sandwiching a seven=nanometer-thick layer of a phase change material (GST) between two layers of a transparent electrode, the team found that they could use a tiny current to 'draw' images within the sandwich "stack."

Initially still images were created using an atomic force microscope, but the researchers went on to demonstrate that such tiny "stacks" can be turned into prototype pixel-like devices. These 'nano-pixels' – just 300 by 300 nanometers in size – can be electrically switched 'on and off' at will, creating the colored dots that would form the building blocks of an extremely high-resolution display technology.

Source

Also: Learn about Slot-Sampled Optical PPM Demodulation.
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