Electronics

Biosensor May Improve Disease Detection

A new biosensor could rapidly and accurately detect early stage disease in very low concentrations. A quick, inexpensive and highly sensitive test that identifies disease markers or other molecules in low-concentration solutions could be the result of a Cornell-developed nanomechanical biosensor, which could potentially help with early stage disease detection.

Posted in: Briefs, MDB, Briefs, Electronics, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials, Diagnostics, Imaging, Medical, Sensors, Sensors and actuators, Diagnosis, Diseases, Medical equipment and supplies, Nanotechnology

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Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Test System

SAKOR Technologies, Inc. (Okemos, MI) designed and installed a complete turnkey Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Test System for UQM Technologies, Inc. (Longmont, CO), a manufacturer of high-efficiency electric propulsion systems. UQM will use the system to test inverters and traction motors for use in hybrid and electric vehicles for the automotive, commercial truck, bus, and military markets.

Posted in: Products, Batteries, Electronics, Power Management, Power Supplies, Energy Efficiency, Test & Measurement, Transportation

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Harnessing the Power of Spinach

Vanderbilt University researches have developed a way to combine Photosystem 1 (PS1), the photosynthetic protein that converts light into electrochemical energy in spinach with silicon (the material used in solar cells), in a fashion that produces substantially more electrical current than has been reported by previous biohybrid solar cells.

Posted in: News, News, Electronics, Energy Harvesting, Renewable Energy, Solar Power

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Underwater Solar Cells?

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Electronics Science and Technology Division, have developed high-band-gap solar cells capable of producing sufficient power to operate electronic sensor systems at water depths of 9 meters.

Posted in: News, News, Electronics, Power Management, Energy Harvesting, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, Sensors

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New Approach to Graphene Electronics

Graphene has been touted as the next silicon, but it is too conductive to be used in computer chips. A University of Manchester team led by Nobel laureates Professor Andre Geim and Professor Konstantin Novoselov has literally opened a third dimension in graphene research.

Posted in: News, News, Electronics, Power Management, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, LEDs, Materials

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Self-Healing Electronics Could Reduce Waste

When one circuit within an integrated chip cracks or fails, the whole chip – or even the whole device – is a loss. University of Illinois engineers have now developed a self-healing system that restores electrical conductivity to a cracked circuit in less time than it takes to blink.

Posted in: News, News, Batteries, Electronics, Recycling Technologies

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Efficient Method for Creating Flexible, Transparent Electrodes

As the market for liquid crystal displays and other electronics continues to drive up the price of indium — the material used to make the indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrodes in these devices — scientists have been searching for a less costly and more dynamic alternative, particularly for use in future flexible electronics.

Posted in: GDM, News, News, Electronics, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, Materials, Metals

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