Electronics & Computers

The Self-Driving Car

Since the first demonstration of a radio-controlled car in 1925, the automotive industry has been seeking to build a reliable driverless vehicle. The safety of robot-quick reflexes and predictive algorithms, combined with the convenience of effortless travel, is appealing. For those who cannot physically drive, an autonomous car allows a new level of freedom. Of the 5.5 million car crashes per year in the United States, 93 per- cent of them have a human cause as the primary factor.1 A self-driving car could reduce such accidents and, as a bonus, use its predictive driving to reduce fuel consumption and traffic congestion.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, White Papers

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Technology-Independent RHBD Library Through Gate Array Approach

All gates in the library are based on one common cell. Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland As semiconductor technology nodes scale down, the limitation on polysilicon pitch makes it almost impossible to shrink libraries built for previous technologies. To design a library for a new technology, all of the cells have to basically start from scratch. Starting over for each technology node shrink is time-consuming and expensive. Further, obtaining space qualification for a technology node will require significant time and money. If a RHBD (radiation-hardened-by-design) library gates invention shares the same transistor structured as the SASIC (Structured Application-Specific Integrated Circuit), it will benefit from the existing qualification effort and high-performance advanced technology of the SASIC design flow.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Briefs

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Advanced Pulse Compression System and Testbed

Industrial applications include 3D machine vision systems that rely on radar for target identification and obstacle avoidance. Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland Detection of low-level water clouds from space is one of the outstanding challenges in radar remote sensing. Spaceborne remote sensing is the only means of assessing the distribution and variability of cloud cover on a global basis. Uncertainties in models of the Earth’s heating budget will persist until CloudSat and follow-on missions such as ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer), with enhanced radar capabilities, complete their missions. Detecting weak scatters at lower altitudes presents significant challenges. Millimeter-wave radars offer the only chance to measure these scatters from space. Unfortunately, the peak power available at Ka and W-band — desirable wavelengths for cloud remote sensing — does not provide adequate sensitivity at the resolution required. For many spaceborne radars, pulse compression techniques are used to overcome the limitations in peak power and take advantage of the average power available. But the backscatter from clouds, even at W-band, can be 7 to 8 orders of magnitude weaker than the surface backscatter. In order to use pulse compression techniques, peak range sidelobes need to be suppressed by upwards of 80 dB.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Briefs

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Quasi-Static Electric Field Generator

This generator is an essential component for human-safe electric field imaging for military and civilian security applications. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia This innovation is an electric field “illumination” system that is a companion component to the e-Sensor. This generator, when combined with the e-Sensor, enables a new, nondestructive inspection technology called electric field imaging (EFI) by producing spatially uniform, large-magnitude, quasi-static electric fields with human-safe currents (supporting only microampere currents) over large areas or large distances. These fields “illuminate” the objects to be inspected, and enable the EFI method to quantify the distortion of the applied electric field of the invention to detect, locate, and characterize materials present (liquid, solid, insulating, semiconducting, conducting, metallic, non-metallic, polymer, ceramic, composite, etc.), material variations, material damage, material age, and to identify hidden structures.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Briefs

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New System Could Prolong Power in Mobile Devices

Researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas have created technology that could be the first step toward wearable computers with self-contained power sources or, more immediately, a smartphone that doesn’t die after a few hours of heavy use. The technology taps into the power of a single electron to control energy consumption inside transistors, which are at the core of most modern electronic systems.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Power Management, PCs/Portable Computers, Semiconductors & ICs, News

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Improved Fuel Cells Could Replace Phone and Laptop Batteries

Fuel cells could replace batteries in mobile phones and laptop computers, and the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country is looking at ways of enhancing their efficiency. Researchers are designing new ways of obtaining energy in a cleaner, safer, and more affordable way. Fuel cells are totally appropriate systems for substituting the batteries of such devices. They turn the energy resulting from the combining of hydrogen and oxygen into electrical power, with water vapor being the only waste product.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Power Management, Energy Storage, Energy Efficiency, Energy, News

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Ultra-Thin 3D Display Promises Greater Energy Efficiency

An ultra-thin LCD screen, developed by a group of researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, holds three-dimensional images without a power source, making the display technology a compact, energy-efficient way to display visual information.In a traditional LCD, liquid crystal molecules are sandwiched between polarized glass plates. Electrodes pass current through the apparatus, influencing the orientation of the liquid crystals inside and manipulating the way they interact with the polarized light. The new displays ditch the electrodes, simultaneously making the screen thinner and decreasing its energy requirements. Once an image is uploaded to the screen via a flash of light, no power is required to keep it there. Because these so-called bi-stable displays draw power only when the image is changed, they are particularly advantageous in applications where a screen displays a static image for most of the time, such as e-book readers or battery status monitors for electronic devices. “Because the proposed LCD does not have any driving electronics, the fabrication is extremely simple. The bi-stable feature provides a low power consumption display that can store an image for several years,” said researcher Abhishek Srivastava.The researchers, however, went further than creating a simple LCD display; they engineered their screen to display images in 3D. SourceAlso: Learn about a Rapid Prototyping Lab (RPL) Generic Display Engine.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Imaging, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Energy Efficiency, Energy, News

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