Articles

2015 Create the Future Design Contest: Grand Prize Winner

Non-Surgical Circulatory Support Device for the Treatment of Chronic Heart Failure Omar Benavides, Benjamin Hertzog, Jace Heuring, Reynolds Delgado, and Will Clifton Procyrion, Inc. Houston, TXProcyrion is developing the first catheter-deployed heart pump intended for long-term treatment of chronic heart failure. Thinner than a #2 pencil and only 6 cm long, Aortix™ has the potential to become a low-risk circulatory assist device for a broad range of patients.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Medical

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2015 Create the Future Design Contest: Aerospace & Defense Category Winner

N5 Filo (First-In-Last-Out): An Ultra-Small, Low-Cost Hazardous Gas Detector Using Novel Chip-Scale Chemical Sensor Technology Abhishek Motayed, Ratan Debnath, Baomei Wen, Audie Castillo, Ting Xie, and Gavin Liu, N5 Sensors Inc., Rockville, MD N5 Sensors is a University of Maryland spinoff that is commercializing a disruptive chipscale gas sensor technology for industrial, environmental, and safety monitoring. The microsensor arrays on a single chip could replace multiple conventional macro-scale gas sensors used in portable multi-gas detectors. These new sensors are small, accurate, low power, and capable of detecting multiple gases at the same time. Using a patent-pending sensing architecture, N5 is working to develop low-cost, ultra-compact, multi-gas detectors that can be interfaced with mobile devices, allowing industrial workers, first-responders, and soldiers to assess the dangers of their surroundings rapidly and accurately in real time using their smartphones or other mobile devices.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Defense

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2015 Create the Future Design Contest: Automotive & Transportation Category Winner

Smart Coating for Corrosion Detection and Protection Luz Marina Calle NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL Researchers, at NASA Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC) Corrosion Technology Laboratory have developed a smart, environmentally friendly coating system for early detection and inhibition of corrosion and self-healing of mechanical damage without external intervention. This coating will have the inherent ability to detect the onset of corrosion in the coated substrate, and respond autonomously to control it.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Automotive

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2015 Create the Future Design Contest: Electronics Category Winner

Real-Time Fiber Optic Sensing System Lance Richards NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center Edwards, CA “The entire team of researchers who have dedicated years to the development of the FOSS technology is honored to receive this award. Since the beginning of our work, we wanted to create a better sensing system, making structural monitoring more comprehensive and lightweight. As we realized how broadly applicable FOSS was, we were inspired to keep innovating.“ A team at NASA Armstrong has developed fiber optic sensing system (FOSS) technology that represents a major breakthrough in high-speed operational monitoring and sensing. Driven by ultra-efficient algorithms, FOSS can be used to determine, in real time, a variety of critical parameters including strain, shape deformation, temperature, liquid level, and operational loads. This state-of-the-art sensor system delivers reliable measurements in the most demanding environments confronted by aerospace, automotive, and energy sectors. FOSS is ideal for monitoring the structural health of aircraft, buildings, and dams; improving the efficiency of turbines and industrial equipment; and detecting instabilities within tunnels and power plants.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Electronics

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2015 Create the Future Design Contest: Machinery/Automation/Robotics Category Winner

Compact, Long-Reach Robotic Arm William R. Doggett, John T. Dorsey, George G. Ganoe, Thomas C. Jones, and Cole K. Corbin, Langley Research Center (Hampton, VA); Bruce D. King, Lockheed Martin (Bethesda, MD); and Charles D. Mercer, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies (New York, NY) Langley’s Tendon-Actuated Lightweight In-Space MANipulator (TALISMAN) technology is a robotic arm with lightweight joints that provide a wide range of motion. The design provides users with a long reach and numerous degrees of freedom. The arm, ideal for use in aquatic environments or for manipulation of light terrestrial loads, consists of articulating booms connected by antagonistic cable tension elements. The arm elements are structurally efficient and lightweight, and support compact packaging.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Machinery & Automation, Robotics

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2015 Create the Future Design Contest: Consumer Products Category Winner

Modular Jet Ski: No Trailer, Affordable, High-Performance Anders Stubkjaer BomBoard LLC Whitewater, WI“Winning the Consumer Products category proves that true design innovation is not only good looks and high performance, but also designing for reduced weight, low manufacturing costs, and for a disruptive sales and service model that, in total, deliver an exceptional customer experience. This win helps provide the necessary external validation that our business seeks, and we will be sure to wear it proudly as we move to the next phase of our voyage.”Millions of water enthusiasts have no practical and affordable way to enjoy a high-performance watercraft close to home. Jet skis typically cost over $10,000 and weigh over 800 pounds. Without a lake home or slip, jet skis, jet boards, and boats require trailers that are difficult to store and haul. The BomBoard is the world’s only high-performance jet board/jet ski transportable in the back of a car. The price of $3,995 makes it affordable to millions of action sports enthusiasts.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Consumer Product Manufacturing

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2015 Create the Future Design Contest: Medical Category Winner

Smart X-ray Source Mark Eaton Stellarray Austin, TX“This recognition is most welcome, since the NASA Tech Briefs readership includes potential users of our technology. The smart x-ray source is a true platform technology with many applications, the latest being a digitally addressable research irradiator we believe will greatly increase productivity in radio biology and radio chemistry. We look forward to hearing from Tech Briefs readers about other ideas they might have for this versatile new tool.”Since the discovery of x-rays 110 years ago, affordable x-ray sources have all been point source x-ray tubes in which x-rays are generated at a single spot on an anode by a single electron beam accelerated at high voltage across a vacuum gap. Generation of x-rays from a single spot, even in rotating anode tubes, limits the flux they can deliver, because most of the e-beam energy will be absorbed in that spot.

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