High-Speed ‘Electron Camera’ Captures Motion — One Quadrillionth of a Second at a Time

Using a method known as ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), a scientific instrument at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, located in Menlo Park, CA, reveals nature’s high-speed processes, including phase changes and the motions of electrons and atomic nuclei within molecules.

Posted in: Articles, Imaging


Finding the Right Lens: The Factors to Focus On

A sharp image requires more than just a good camera; it also takes the right lens. Several aspects must be considered to make sure that the camera and lens work perfectly together and fit a specific application.

Posted in: Articles, Imaging


From 2D to 3D: MARVEL Tool Offers Immersive View Inside the Brain

Thanks to a partnership between a surgeon and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a new camera system could improve minimally invasive surgeries and provide 3D endoscopic images of the brain.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Articles, Imaging


Choosing the Right Potentiometer for Reliable Sensing

In today’s market, there are a variety of available types of position sensing systems. It is important to compare unique features to application needs in order to find the best fit.A potentiometer sensor is an electromechanical component that consists of a resistor where the voltage divider value can be measured at any position by means of sliding contacts between the applied voltage values. Physically, a potentiometer consists, at a minimum, of a resistance track, a collector track, and a sliding contact that can be moved along the resistance track by means of mechanics (Figure 1). The movement of the sliding contact can be rotatory (angle) or translational (path).

Posted in: Articles, Motion Control


2015 Create the Future Design Contest

The 2015 Create the Future Design Contest — sponsored by COMSOL, Mouser Electronics, and Tech Briefs Media Group (publishers of NASA Tech Briefs) — recognized innovation in product design in seven categories: Aerospace & Defense, Automotive/ Transportation, Consumer Products, Electronics, Machinery/Automation/ Robotics, Medical, and Sustainable Technologies. In this special section, you’ll meet the Grand Prize Winner, as well as the winners and Honorable Mentions in all seven categories, chosen from a record 1,159 new product ideas submitted from across the world. To view all of the entries online, visit

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace


2015 Create the Future Design Contest: Grand Prize Winner

Non-Surgical Circulatory Support Device for the Treatment of Chronic Heart Failure Omar Benavides, Benjamin Hertzog, Jace Heuring, Reynolds Delgado, and Will Clifton Procyrion, Inc. Houston, TXProcyrion is developing the first catheter-deployed heart pump intended for long-term treatment of chronic heart failure. Thinner than a #2 pencil and only 6 cm long, Aortix™ has the potential to become a low-risk circulatory assist device for a broad range of patients.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Medical


2015 Create the Future Design Contest: Aerospace & Defense Category Winner

N5 Filo (First-In-Last-Out): An Ultra-Small, Low-Cost Hazardous Gas Detector Using Novel Chip-Scale Chemical Sensor Technology Abhishek Motayed, Ratan Debnath, Baomei Wen, Audie Castillo, Ting Xie, and Gavin Liu, N5 Sensors Inc., Rockville, MD N5 Sensors is a University of Maryland spinoff that is commercializing a disruptive chipscale gas sensor technology for industrial, environmental, and safety monitoring. The microsensor arrays on a single chip could replace multiple conventional macro-scale gas sensors used in portable multi-gas detectors. These new sensors are small, accurate, low power, and capable of detecting multiple gases at the same time. Using a patent-pending sensing architecture, N5 is working to develop low-cost, ultra-compact, multi-gas detectors that can be interfaced with mobile devices, allowing industrial workers, first-responders, and soldiers to assess the dangers of their surroundings rapidly and accurately in real time using their smartphones or other mobile devices.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Defense


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