Features

Lidar Sensor

Velodyne LiDAR (Morgan Hill, CA) has announced the Puck Hi-Res™ sensor. Expanding on the company’s VLP-16 Puck, a 16-channel, real-time 3D lidar sensor, Puck Hi-Res provides greater resolution in the captured 3D image. Puck Hi-Res retains the VLP- 16 Puck’s 360° horizontal field-of-view (FoV) and 100-meter range, but offers a 20° vertical field of view for a tighter channel distribution — 1.33° between channels instead of 2.00°. The real-time LiDAR sensor supports autonomous-vehicle, 3D-mapping, and surveillance industries and applications.

Posted in: Products, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Sensors

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Pressure Sensor

SignalFire Wireless Telemetry (Hudson, MA) has introduced the Pressure Scout, a wireless pressure sensor that supports pressure monitoring and alarm reporting as part of the SignalFire Remote Sensing System. The first in a line of wireless integrated sensors, the Pressure Scout consists of a pressure sensor (integrated with a wireless node) and internal battery. Ideal applications for the device include well tubing and casing pressure monitoring, tank level monitoring, and compressor station status monitoring.

Posted in: Products, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Sensors

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Magnetic Sensors

Wireless, non-contact magnetic sensors from Steute Industrial Controls (Ridgefield, CT), in the presence of their actuating magnet, send a unique, coded telegram to one or more compatible, easily-programmed receivers. The receiver accepts up to 10 discrete telegrams per channel. The magnetic devices, powered by a field-replaceable lithium battery, operate at 915 MHz (USA/Canada/Australia) or 868 MHz (Europe). Other features include sensing range of up to 30 mm; bidirectional communications with receiver; IP67 ingress protection rating; operating temperature range of -20 to + 65 °C; and a stainless-steel or glass-fiber reinforced plastic housing.

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Pressure Sensors

All Sensors Corporation (Morgan Hill, CA) now offers the DLHR pressure sensor series. The new devices feature lower pressure ranges of 0.5 to 60 in H2O. All error compensation is performed internally by an advanced ASIC; no external calculation is required. The DLHR products include I2C or SPI output interfaces with 16/17/18-bit resolution. With the ability to operate at a low, variable supply voltage (from 1.68V to 3.6V), the DLHR Series supports portable applications, including medical devices associated with low pressure, remote sensing, spirometry, and industrial controls. Devices are available in 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 60 in H2O pressure.

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Humidity Sensor

The Humidity Sensor from Develco Products (Aarhus, Denmark) allows end-users to track indoor climate. Regular readings can be sent from the sensor to an app. Users control the humidity level and temperature from a distance; several households or institutions can be monitored from one central point. Equipped with the wireless technology ZigBee, Develco’s new sensor is easily connected with other existing devices in “smart home” applications. A ventilation system, thermostat, or air-conditioner can automatically be activated by the humidity sensor.

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Seeing Closer and Clearer with NASA Imaging Technology

From mapping asteroids and planets, to recording rocket engine tests, to seeing farther into the human brain, NASA’s imaging technologies are giving scientists and engineers closer, more detailed views than ever before.NASA’s Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-Rex) spacecraft launched on September 8 to the near-Earth asteroid Bennu to harvest a sample of surface material and return it to Earth for study. But before the science team selects a sample site, they can find out a bit about Bennu’s elemental make-up.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace

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Unmanned Research Aircraft Test Cutting-Edge Innovations

NASA-funded aircraft tests parameters that can’t be modeled in simulations.Born out of a desire for aircraft to be able to take off and land capably at airports with shorter runways to alleviate congestion at the major hubs, the circulation control wing concept has been floated by the aeronautical community as a possible solution for decades. The technology calls for increased amounts of high-pressure air, derived from either the jet engines or separate compressors, to flow over the leading and trailing edges of the wings, creating greater lift. Given extra lift, an aircraft can take off and land at a lower speed, thus reducing the length of runway needed. Extra lift also enables increased weight-carrying capacity.

Posted in: Articles, Spinoff, Aerospace

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