Features

America’s Premier Nano Engineering Event

The 2008 NASA Tech Briefs National Nano Engineering Conference (NNEC), be held November 12-13 at the Boston Colonnade Hotel, is for design engineers who want to know what’s real, what’s close to market, and what might be coming in the world of nanotechnology. The NNEC will help you keep pace with the engineering and technology innovations behind the latest nanotech breakthroughs. Included will be technical presentations and exhibits from companies leading the nanotech industry in application areas such as biomedical, electronics, advanced materials, energy and the environment, and business. Read about some of those advanced technologies below. You’ll also find networking opportunities, and the expert insight you’ll need to stay ahead of the small-tech curve.

Posted in: Articles

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The Brighter Side of Globalization for Manufacturers: New, Innovative Product Development Models

By Fielder Hiss Director of Product Management Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. Concord, MA Global competition is an oft-cited reason for any number of ills in manufacturing, from job loss to price erosion. Viewed through another prism by savvy companies, however, globalization is something else altogether — specifically, a competitive advantage.

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Sensor Technology Leads Manufacturing into Predictive Maintenance

Reactive, avoidable equipment repairs are a leading contributor to lost productivity in industrial manufacturing operations. Parts with an average selling price of just a few dollars can cost manufacturers many times that in repairs and unrealized revenue once they fail. In a worst-case scenario, undetected faults can cascade through the system, causing widespread damage and triggering major and expensive production outages.

Posted in: Articles, Motion Control

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Flexible Digital Servo Drives Speed Machine Control Design

Advances in digital hardware technology and software innovations now allow a single digital servo drive to be configured to work in a variety of machine control architectures.

Posted in: Articles, Motion Control

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Going Green in the Workplace with LEDs

In August 2007, Cree’s management made a bold decision to replace the existing fluorescent lighting technology at its Durham, NC facility with new energy-saving, environmentally friendly LED lighting technology. The group started with the company’s headquarters building, but eventually plans to replace more than 7,000 existing fluorescent light fixtures covering more than 800,000 square feet campus-wide. Phase one replaced 200 existing fixtures in 7,000 square feet of space in the visitor lobby, waiting areas and conference rooms. All the exterior parking lot lighting was also converted from high-pressure sodium to LED lighting. Both parts of phase one had to be completed by early November 2007, just 3 months later.

Posted in: Articles, Features, ptb catchall, Photonics

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Dr. Jonathan Trent, Bioengineering Research Scientist, Ames Research Center

Dr. Jonathan Trent is an expert in the use of extremophile proteins to create nanoscale electronic devices. An extremophile is a life form capable of surviving in the harshest conditions on earth including severe heat, bitter cold, and extremely acidic or alkaline environments. The recipient of a 2006 Nano 50 Award as one of the leading innovators in the field of nanotechnology, Dr. Trent also leads the GREEN (Global Research into Energy and the Environment at NASA) Team at Ames Research Center.

Posted in: Who's Who

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Powered by Lithium-Ion Batteries, NASA Spacecraft Explore Mars and the Moon

Lithium-ion batteries Yardney Technical Products Pawcatuck, CT 860-599-1100 www.yardney.com NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander landed safely near the planet’s north polar icecap in May. Phoenix relies on advanced lithiumion batteries from Yardney Technical Products to dig and look for water, seeking a habitable environment. The Phoenix batteries provide power at night when there is no sunlight for the solar panels to convert to electricity. They can also be used any time when a task requires more power than the primary power source can deliver.

Posted in: Application Briefs

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