Features

NASA LED Chips Light the Way to Safe Healing

The WARP 10 was designed to assist armed forces personnel with immediate first-aid care for minor injuries and pain.Light-emitting diode (LED) chips used to grow plants in space are now being used on Earth for healing wounds and treating chronic pain and cancer. In 1993, Quantum Devices Inc. (QDI) of Barneveld, WI, began developing technology to create high-intensity, solid-state LED systems for NASA’s space shuttle plant growth experiments. The company found that red LED wavelengths could boost the energy metabolism of cells to advance plant growth.

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NASA Technology Used to Rehab Soldiers

With S.A.M., only one therapist is needed to assist a patient, even if the patient has no sense of balance. (NASA)A physical therapy device based on NASA-developed technology is being used by Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, to rehabilitate military patients — including soldiers returning from Iraq — who have spinal cord or traumatic brain injuries. The Secure Ambulation Module (S.A.M.) is a product of Enduro Medical Technology of East Hartford, CT.

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NASA Experiment Studies Next-Generation Smoke Detectors

A candle flame in Earth’s gravity (left) and microgravity (right) show the difference in the processes of combustion in microgravity. (NASA/Glenn Research Center)As frightening as a fire is on Earth, it’s even scarier in space. “If a chair is on fire in your home, you have time to get out. In a spacecraft, you don’t,” said NASA scientist Dr. David Urban. “You have to detect smoke in an early pre-fire state, so you can stop it before it starts.”

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NASA Studies Paper-Like Plastic for Space Electronics

On the right is an antenna array embedded on liquid crystal polymer (LCP); a large sheet of LCP is on the left. (Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek)NASA’s Earth Science Technology Office and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) are evaluating a material called liquid crystal polymer (LCP) for electronics applications in space, as well as possible uses in consumer electronics. The ultra-thin, paper-like plastic can incorporate a variety of electronic circuits, while still molding to any shape. It also performs well in extreme temperatures and intense radiation found in space.

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NASA Teams With Army to Analyze Helicopter Parts Failure

From left: James Van Hoose and Dr. Po Chen, engineers with Qualis Corporation inThe Materials and Processes Laboratory at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center has partnered with the Aviation Engineering Directorate of the U.S. Army’s Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center to conduct failure analysis on helicopter parts. Using Marshall’s capabilities in metallurgy, the lab analyzed aircraft components such as engine parts, swash plates, and fasteners from Army helicopters that flew in the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. It was found that the parts all experienced some type of failure with metal castings, forgings, or extrusions.

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Dr. Walter Merrill, Associate for Business Development, John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH

Dr. Walter MerrillDr. Walter Merrill is involved in a variety of programs aimed at forming partnerships with private and public entities. For the past five years, he has been working towards developing microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices that are made out silicon carbide. In that capacity, Dr. Merrill was instrumental in helping NASA Glenn Research Center, the State of Ohio, and Case Western Reserve University launch the Glennan Microsystems Initiative to address the research, development, and application needs of NASA and industry in the field of MEMS.

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David Wilt, Electrical Engineer, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH

David WiltAs part of the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment (FTSCE), a team of engineers from NASA Glenn, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Ohio State University has developed a new type of solar cell that is durable, lightweight, and highly efficient. David Wilt is an electrical engineer at NASA Glenn who is working on the project.

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