Features

Products of Tomorrow: June 2015

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

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Choosing the Right Batteries for High-Tech Devices

Wireless technology is growing rapidly, now encompassing consumer-grade devices as well as industrial-grade products used in utility meter reading (AMR/AMI), wireless mesh networks, system control and data acquisition (SCADA), data loggers, measurement while drilling, oceanographic measurements, emergency/safety equipment, and M2M communications. The rise in wireless technology is closely tied to the development of low-power communications protocols such as ZigBee, Bluetooth, DASH7, INSTEON, and Z-Wave.

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Software Helps NASA Simulate Performance of James Webb Telescope

Femap™ engineering simulation software Siemens PLM Software Plano, TX 972-987-3000 www.siemens.com/plm Scheduled for launch in 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Observatory will operate 1.5 million kilometers above the Earth. Its mission is ambitious: examining every phase of cos mic history. The telescope will look back light years into the past.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Articles

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Improved Calibration Shows Images’ True Colors

Camera calibration techniques for monitoring propulsion tests are used to improve quality of satellite images. In satellite images, the true color of a body of water, or anything else they depict, is not precise. Radiometric calibration, which improves the color accuracy of an image and enables it to be used to solve remote sensing problems, has always been a costly endeavor. A cooperative effort between Stennis Space Center and Innovative Imaging and Research Corporation (I2R), a small business located on the center’s campus in southern Mississippi, is changing that.

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Editor's Choice: June 2015

A new technique verifies and identifies a person based on features drawn from electrocardiographic (ECG) leads. It can identify a person from a group of known subjects, or verify a person to allow access to a secure facility or access to Internet control of computers, airplanes, weapons, and alarms. It uses the ECG signals generated by the heart during contraction and relaxation that are characteristic to an individual. The method can be used by homeland security personnel and law enforcement, and in airports and other high-security locations. Find out more HERE.

Posted in: Articles, UpFront

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Robonaut 2 Wins 2014 Government Invention of the Year

Robonaut 2, NASA’s first humanoid robot in space, was selected as the NASA Government Invention of the Year for 2014. The NASA selection committee evaluated the robot in the following areas: aerospace significance, industry significance, humanitarian significance, technology readiness level, NASA use, industry use, and creativity.

Posted in: Articles, UpFront

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Meanwhile on the Space Station…

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian Cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko have begun a one-year mission in space. The mission will help researchers better understand how the human body reacts and adapts to long-duration spaceflight. While on the ISS, Kelly’s identical twin brother, retired NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, will undergo comparative genetic studies. Differences, or lack thereof, between the Kelly brothers after Scott’s year in space and Mark’s year on Earth could shed new light on the effects of spaceflight on the human body.

Posted in: Articles, UpFront

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