Features

Radiation Detectors Help NASA Understand Planets from Orbiters and Landers

Mercurous halide-based radiation detectors Brimrose Corporation of America Sparks, MD 410-472-7070 www.brimrose.com Brimrose is developing radiation detectors that can improve NASA’s ability to determine surface and subsurface composition of planetary bodies from orbiters and landers. Unlike most radiation detectors, these detectors can perform both gamma and neutron spectroscopy. The new detectors are based on mercurous halide materials. The mercurous halides are new wide-bandgap semiconductor detector materials that can provide radiation detection with low cost, high performance, and long-term stability.

Posted in: Application Briefs

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3D Endoscope Boosts Safety and Cuts Cost of Surgery

NASA’s 3D imaging technology goes from space to brain surgery. In 2007, Dr. Hrayr Shahinian was looking for an engineering team to help him develop an endoscopic device suitable for brain surgery, and capable of both steering its lens and producing a three-dimensional video image. He discovered that the person he was seated next to at a social function was Charles Elachi, director of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

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Product of the Month: January 2016

Dewetron, Wakefield, RI, announced the TRIONet compact data acquisition system that accepts any two of the company’s multi-channel TRION series plug-in modules. The system connects to any Windows computer via USB 3.0 (or USB 2.0) or Ethernet. TRIONet mainframes can be interconnected using Ethernet. As a result, TRIONet mainframes can be placed up to 100 meters apart. Both star and daisy-chain topologies are supported, depending on the physical environment. A 9- to 36-VDC power input allows TRIONet to be operated from vehicle power. A small touchscreen color display shows the status, IP address, and health of the mainframe. Each mainframe can support up to 16 high-speed analog channels of many different types. There are various analog, digital, data bus, and timing modules available. Measuring 12.6 × 8 × 2.2", the system weighs 5 pounds with one TRION-2402-MULTI module. TRIONet consists of the mainframe, a TRION-2402-MULTI (universal input) 8-channel module, the company’s OXYGEN data acquisition software, and cables for both USB 3.0 and Ethernet. The system can be used with Windows 7 or 10 computers or tablets. For Free Info Visit http://info.hotims.com/61057-120

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AEGIS Imaging Software Unearths Mars Rocks

In mid-October, a NASA-developed software called AEGIS was uploaded to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. The AEGIS technology, winner of NASA’s 2011 Software of the Year award, will soon allow scientists on the ground to more easily identify interesting rocks and other terrain features on the Red Planet.

Posted in: Articles, Photonics

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Hybrid Technology Advances Laser Material Processing

MultiWave Hybrid Technology* combines multiple laser beams with various wavelengths into a single coaxial laser beam. There are existing systems using two different laser wavelengths independently, but this is the first technology capable of combining multiple wavelengths into a single beam, providing a valuable tool for the development of novel material processing technologies.

Posted in: Articles, Photonics

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Manufacturing OLED Lighting

Organic Light Emitting Diode (“OLED”) lighting panels are thin planar area light sources that are naturally diffuse, low glare, high color rendering, cool to the touch, highly energy efficient and highly controllable. Together with LED light sources, they compose the solid state lighting technologies that are replacing over 100 years of bulb and tube lighting technologies, just as solid state electronics have replaced the bulbs and tubes used in electronic devices such as radios, computers and displays.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Photonics

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‘Internal Fingerprint’ Imaging Offers Deeper Authentication

A new technology developed by researchers from The Langevin Institute (Paris, France) enables subsurface imaging of the finger. The “internal fingerprint,” according to the device’s creators, could provide cheaper, more secure authentication than traditional scanners.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Photonics

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