Features

Jim Heidmann, Project Manager for NASA’s Advanced Air Transport Technology Project, and Jason Welstead, Aerospace Engineer

Jim Heidmann, Project Manager for NASA’s Advanced Air Transport Technology Project, and Jason Welstead, Aerospace Engineer Jim Heidmann of Glenn Research Center (Cleveland, OH) and Jason Welstead of Langley Research Center (Hampton, VA) have led NASA efforts to develop all-electric and hybrid-electric designs for large passenger aircraft. Using low-carbon propulsion technology, they are exploring how planes can be redesigned and configured.

Posted in: Who's Who

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Product of the Month: March 2016

Paul N. Gardner Co., Pompano Beach, FL, announced the SmarTest coating thickness measurement system that consists of an app and a wireless sensor for measuring coating thickness with the help of a smartphone or tablet. The system uses Sensor-integrated Digital Signal Processing (SIDSP®) sensors combined with wireless technology to measure coating thickness. The digitally generated readings on the sensor are relayed by Bluetooth to a smartphone or tablet. The SmarTest App functions as an evaluation device, replacing a conventional coating thickness gauge. The app displays current measuring value, statistical evaluation, storage of measuring values in files, 2-point calibration, measuring unit metric/imperial switchover, and export of the series of measurement in the CSV format. All the functionalities of a smartphone are available for data transfer. The sensor can function for up to 8 hours in continuous operation, and the dual Bluetooth module ensures a long operating time in modern devices. For Free Info Visit http://info.hotims.com/61059-120

Posted in: Products

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Celebrate Pi Day with NASA Goddard and Discover Pi-Sat

The Innovative Technology Partnerships Office (ITPO) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (Goddard) in Greenbelt, MD, invites you to celebrate Pi Day on March 14 and discover Pi-Sat. Current technology trends indicate a shift in satellite architectures from large, single satellite missions, to small, distributed spacecraft missions. At the center of this shift is the smallSat/cubesat architecture.

Posted in: Articles

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Products of Tomorrow: March 2016

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Products

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Simulation Software is Key to Orion’s Heat-Shield Success

Tecplot 360 EX data visualization and analysis software Tecplot, Inc. Bellevue, WA 800-763-7005 www.tecplot.com NASA chose Tecplot 360 EX for use in the design of the heat shield for the Orion spacecraft. Orion’s heat shield, a protective blanket built with high-tech fibers and ceramics, is crucial to mission success. The outer layer of the heat shield is designed to burn away as it heats up during re-entry into the atmosphere, thus maintaining the integrity of the inner layer and helping to ensure the survivability of the spacecraft.

Posted in: Application Briefs

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Cryogenic Seal for Space Launch System Handles Extreme Pressure Conditions

OmniSeal® RACO™ Spring-Energized Seals Saint-Gobain Seals Garden Grove, CA 800-544-0080 www.seals.saint-gobain.com Saint-Gobain Seals produced a cryogenic seal measuring more than six feet wide for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) project. Although this launch system replaced the retired space shuttle, it was built using proven hardware from the space shuttle era and previous successful exploration programs, as well as cutting-edge tooling and manufacturing technology in order to reduce development time and cost. SLS’ first mission, Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), will go into space in late 2018, and uses Saint-Gobain seals.

Posted in: Application Briefs

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NASA-Developed Platform Integrates Sensors with Smartphones

Carbon-nanotube-based gas detectors paved the way for interchangeable smartphone-savvy sensors. In 2007, when the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a call for a sensor that could equip a smartphone with the ability to detect dangerous gases and chemicals, NASA Ames Research Center scientist Jing Li had a ready response. She had been developing the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes that respond to various gases and compounds for use in NASA applications such as evaluating planetary atmospheres, detecting chemicals around rocket launch pads, and monitoring the performance of life-support systems. Her proposal was awarded funding in 2008, but she needed a way for the device to “sniff” the air for samples, and a system that would allow it to interface with a smartphone.

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