Features

CMOS Cameras

SMARTEK Vision (Cakovec, Croatia/New London, CT) has added GCP2061 and GCP2046 models to its Giganetix Plus camera series. The new industrial cameras are equipped with the Sony Pregius Exmor IMX250 and IMX252 sensors. With a high dynamic range of 70.9 dB and a readnoise value of 2.3 e-, the models support outdoor and traffic-monitoring applications. The cameras have a resolution of 3.2 or 5.1 megapixels at a pixel size of 3.45 μm. A variable-speed shutter function, a variety of exposure methods, a maximum of 64 definable regions of interest, and external trigger modes all enable application control and image transmission. Additional features of the Giganetix Plus series include fully GigE Vision-compliant hardware and driver interfaces, Windows- and Linux-compatible Giganetix GigE Vision SDK, and the use of industrial connectivity standards. For Free Info Visit: http://info.hotims.com/55596-155

Posted in: Products

Read More >>

Dr. Santo A. Padula, Materials Research Engineer, Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH

Dr. Santo Padula has developed testing techniques to support the development of advanced materials like metallic foams and shape memory alloys (SMAs). SMAs are metals that “remember” their original shape. With the application of heat, a deformed SMA returns to its initial form.

Posted in: Who's Who

Read More >>

Al Bowers, Chief Scientist, Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA

Al Bowers is the program manager of Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Lower Drag, or Prandtl-d. The project’s researchers validated elements of a boomerang-shaped wing design that could greatly improve the efficiency of future aircraft.

Posted in: Who's Who

Read More >>

Editor's Choice: November 2015

A safety system for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) monitors crucial components and transmits system health information to a human operator, who can then trigger onboard emergency maneuvers. When operating close to the ground, this system lets the operator take over control of the vehicle entirely. Find out more HERE.

Posted in: UpFront

Read More >>

Homesteading on Mars

When moving from one city to another, people rarely bring their house with them. They rent, buy, or build a new one. Astronauts have to bring everything they might need on their journey, no matter how small, which increases cargo mass and mission cost. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center is asking: what if astronauts could simply use what they found when they arrived on a new destination like Mars? What if they could live off the land, and make tools, equipment, and even habitats with Martian dirt or a recyclable material?

Posted in: UpFront

Read More >>

Flu Shot in Space Helps Understand Astronauts’ Immune Systems

It is that time of year when you see reminders to get your flu vaccine. For identical twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly, their flu shots will happen almost in tandem, but while one is orbiting the Earth at 17,500 miles per hour, and the other is on Earth. Scott will receive his flu shot aboard the International Space Station, and Mark will receive his on Earth shortly thereafter. Blood will be drawn from both brothers before and after the vaccination, as well as throughout the duration of the one-year mission to compare how their systems respond to the vaccine.

Posted in: UpFront

Read More >>

Products of Tomorrow: November 2015

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Products

Read More >>