Features

Embedded System for Machine Vision

The EyeVBox II system from EVT (Karlsruhe, Germany) offers an Intel® AtomTM processor, four USB 2.0 interfaces at the back of the device, and two USB 2.0 interfaces at the front; interfaces, such as DVI-I and HDMI, are also available. Because the processors feature low-power consumption from the embedded or laptop area, the EyeVBox II does not need a fan and can be operated passively.

Posted in: Imaging, Products

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GigE Smart Camera

ADLINK (Taipei, Taiwan) has released a quad-core x86 smart camera, the NEON-1040. The device features a 4-MP 60-fps global shutter sensor, quad core Intel® Atom™ 1.9 GHz processors, and flexible software support. With FPGA coprocessor support, the NEON-1040 accelerates image pre-processing, including LUT (look up table), ROI (region of interest), and shading correction.

Posted in: Imaging, Products

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CMOS Cameras

The LX series from Baumer (Radeberg, Germany) features high-resolution CMOSIS sensors, a dual GigE interface, and 240 MB/s bandwidth. The cameras operate with 8-, 12-, and 20-megapixel resolutions. Eight- and 12-megapixel models utilize the CMOSIS 5.5 μm pixel design. The 20 MP model, with 6.4-μm pixel structure, features a low noise of 8 e- and a dynamic range of 66 dB. Because of its standard-compliant Dual GigE interface, the 20-MP GigE Vision camera currently available enables cost-efficient system integration.

Posted in: Imaging, Products

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Products of Tomorrow: September 2014

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Products, Articles

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Robots are (Almost) People, Too

Biologically inspired robots have been an ongoing fascination in movies for years. We know that robots can’t cry, bleed, or feel like humans can, and that’s what makes them different. But what if they could think like humans? Biologically inspired robots are being realized by engineers and scientists all over the world. While much emphasis is placed on developing physical characteristics for robots such as human-like faces or artificial muscles, engineers in the Telerobotics Research and Applications Group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, are among those working to program robots with forms of artificial intelligence similar to human thinking processes.

Posted in: Articles

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NASA Uses Analysis Software to Assess Orion Crew Module Heat Shield

HyperSizer® composite analysis and structural sizing software Collier Research Corp. Newport News, VA 757-825-0000 www.hypersizer.com Protected by the shell of its huge launch rocket during blastoff, NASA’s Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) must get back to Earth on its own at mission’s end. The flight plan for this next-generation craft includes a dramatic ocean splashdown reminiscent of the Apollo program that predated the Space Shuttle’s smooth runway landings.

Posted in: Application Briefs

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Satellite Data Monitors Nation’s Forests

Data obtained from NASA satellites helps scientists monitor damage caused by wildfires, drought, and other natural disturbances. Joe Spruce’s last name is a fitting one: Spruce is a research scientist at NASA’s Stennis Space Center working with the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service to monitor forests and other vegetation across the country using NASA satellite data.

Posted in: Articles, Spinoff

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