Imaging

Scientists Find New Way to Image Solar Cells in 3-D

The Molecular Foundry’s Edward Barnard is part of a team of scientists that developed a new way to see inside solar cells. (Credit: Marilyn Chung) Next-generation solar cells made of super-thin films of semiconducting material hold promise because they’re relatively inexpensive and flexible enough to be applied just about anywhere. Researchers are working to dramatically increase the efficiency at which thin-film solar cells convert sunlight to electricity. But it’s a tough challenge, partly because a solar cell’s subsurface realm—where much of the energy-conversion action happens—is inaccessible to real-time, nondestructive imaging. It’s difficult to improve processes you can’t see.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Lasers & Laser Systems, Photonics

Read More >>

Infrared Brings to Light Nanoscale Molecular Arrangement

Detailing the molecular makeup of materials – from solar cells to organic LEDs and transistors to medically important proteins – is not always a crystal-clear process. To understand how materials work at these microscopic scales and to better design materials to improve their function, it's necessary to know not only about their composition but also their molecular arrangement and microscopic imperfections.

Posted in: News, Imaging

Read More >>

New Catheter Lets Doctors See Inside Arteries

Removing plaque from clogged arteries is a common procedure that can save and improve lives. This treatment approach has been made safer and more effective with a high-tech catheter that allows cardiologists to see inside arteries for the first time, cutting out only the diseased tissue. Interventional cardiologists at Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center at UC San Diego Health are the first in the region to use this technology.

Posted in: News, Imaging

Read More >>

Mapping Marine Snow on Sea Floor

City-sized maps of terrain and life on the sea floor have revealed that drifts of "marine snow" on submarine hillsides act as a source of food to fuel a higher biomass of marine life than on flatter plains. This finding comes from research by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) that may improve understanding of how hillside slopes and plateaus drive the distribution of marine life. The marine snow was quantified using machine vision, where an algorithm automatically detected the location and coverage in digital images.

Posted in: News, Imaging

Read More >>

New Scanning Method Speeds Up 3D Printing

Penn State University researchers have used a beam deflector to increase the speed of 2D and 3D printing by up to 1000 times.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling

Read More >>

Researchers Propose Modular Space Telescope

Researchers from California Institute of Technology are proposing the idea of a modular space telescope that could be assembled by robots. The space observatory would have a primary mirror with a diameter of 100 meters — 40 times larger than the Hubble Space Telescope.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Optical Components, Optics

Read More >>

New Algorithm Reveals Underground Water Levels

Researchers from Stanford University have used satellite data and a new computer algorithm to gauge groundwater levels in Colorado’s San Luis Valley agricultural basin. The technique "fills in" underground water levels in areas where quality data had been previously unavailable.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Visualization Software, Antennas, RF & Microwave Electronics

Read More >>

Scientists Create Reflection-Removing Camera

In recent years, computer scientists have been investigating a range of techniques for removing reflections from digital photographs shot through glass. Some have tried to use variability in focal distance or the polarization of light; others, like those at MIT, have exploited the fact that a pane of glass produces not one but two reflections, slightly offset from each other. This led to them developing a system that fires light into a scene and gauges the differences between the arrival times of light reflected by nearby objects — such as panes of glass — and more distant objects.

Posted in: Articles, News, Cameras, Imaging

Read More >>

Researchers Develop New Lens for Terahertz Radiation

Terahertz radiation is a relatively unexplored slice of the electromagnetic spectrum, but it holds the promise of countless new imaging applications as well as wireless communication networks with extremely high bandwidth. The problem is that there are few off-the-shelf components available for manipulating terahertz waves. Now, researchers from Brown University’s School of Engineering have developed a new type of lens for focusing terahertz radiation (which spans from about 100 to 10,000 GHz). The lens, made from an array of stacked metal plates with spaces between them, performs as well or better than existing terahertz lenses, and the architecture used to build the device could set the stage for a range of other terahertz components that don’t currently exist. The work was led by Rajind Mendis, assistant professor of engineering (research) at Brown, who worked with Dan Mittleman, professor of engineering at Brown.

Posted in: Articles, News, Imaging

Read More >>

Flexible Sheet Camera Wraps Around Objects

A novel sheet camera developed by Columbia Engineering researchers can be wrapped around everyday objects to capture images that cannot be taken with one or more conventional cameras.

Posted in: News, Cameras, Imaging

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.