Imaging

AEGIS Imaging Software Unearths Mars Rocks

In mid-October, a NASA-developed software called AEGIS was uploaded to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. The AEGIS technology, winner of NASA’s 2011 Software of the Year award, will soon allow scientists on the ground to more easily identify interesting rocks and other terrain features on the Red Planet.

Posted in: Articles, Photonics

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Hybrid Technology Advances Laser Material Processing

MultiWave Hybrid Technology* combines multiple laser beams with various wavelengths into a single coaxial laser beam. There are existing systems using two different laser wavelengths independently, but this is the first technology capable of combining multiple wavelengths into a single beam, providing a valuable tool for the development of novel material processing technologies.

Posted in: Articles, Photonics

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SPIE Photonics West 2016 Preview

The SPIE Photonics West 2016 technical conference and exhibition returns to The Moscone Center in San Francisco, February 13-18, offering attendees the opportunity to explore the latest innovations in lasers, photonics, optics, optoelectronics, biophotonics, biomedical optics, 3D printing and more. As in the past, the event will once again kick off with BiOS, the world’s largest biomedical optics conference, before transitioning into the Photonics West conference and exhibition. Last year’s event hosted more than 21,000 attendees and put the products and services of over 1,250 exhibitors on display. More than 4,800 technical papers will be available to conference participants throughout the week.

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Thermal Imaging Cameras See Through the Smoke

Scientists, researchers, automation specialists, electrical and building professionals, and security specialists use thermal imaging cameras (TICs) to discover hidden heat patterns and gain new insights in their fields of expertise. Thermal imaging technology, however, can also save lives. Firefighters use thermal imaging cameras every day to see through smoke, locate and rescue victims, identify hot spots, navigate safely, and stay better oriented during response missions.

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High-Speed ‘Electron Camera’ Captures Motion — One Quadrillionth of a Second at a Time

Using a method known as ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), a scientific instrument at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, located in Menlo Park, CA, reveals nature’s high-speed processes, including phase changes and the motions of electrons and atomic nuclei within molecules.

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Finding the Right Lens: The Factors to Focus On

A sharp image requires more than just a good camera; it also takes the right lens. Several aspects must be considered to make sure that the camera and lens work perfectly together and fit a specific application.

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From 2D to 3D: MARVEL Tool Offers Immersive View Inside the Brain

Thanks to a partnership between a surgeon and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a new camera system could improve minimally invasive surgeries and provide 3D endoscopic images of the brain.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Articles

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Analyst Roundtable: Machine Vision Moves Beyond Manufacturing

Imaging technology is playing an increasingly important role, for traditional industry sectors like manufacturing as well as emerging segments outside of the factory. Companies are looking to automate their operations. Lower costs have enabled customers to use camera-based technologies for the very first time. Vision systems have become more capable than single-purpose devices.

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‘Ralph’ Camera Shows Pluto in Color

Thanks to a camera affectionately known as “Ralph,” NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has delivered stunning natural-color images of Pluto and its moons.

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Researcher Spotlight: Imaging Software Improves Video Monitoring of Vital Signs

By detecting nearly imperceptible changes in skin color, emerging imaging technologies have been able to extract pulse rate, breathing rate, and other vital signs from a person facing a camera. The videography tools have struggled, however, to compensate for low light conditions, dark skin tones, and movement.

Posted in: Articles, Briefs

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