Imaging

New Navigation Software Cuts Self-Driving Car Costs

A new software system developed at the University of Michigan uses video game technology to help solve one of the most daunting hurdles facing self-driving and automated cars: the high cost of the laser scanners they use to determine their location.Ryan Wolcott, a U-M doctoral candidate in computer science and engineering, estimates that the new concept could shave thousands of dollars from the cost of these vehicles. The technology enables them to navigate using a single video camera, delivering the same level of accuracy as laser scanners at a fraction of the cost."The laser scanners used by most self-driving cars in development today cost tens of thousands of dollars, and I thought there must be a cheaper sensor that could do the same job," he said. "Cameras only cost a few dollars each and they're already in a lot of cars. So they were an obvious choice."Wolcott's system builds on the navigation systems used in other self-driving cars that are currently in development, including Google's vehicle. The navigation systems use three-dimensional laser scanning technology to create a real-time map of their environment, then compare that real-time map to a pre-drawn map stored in the system. By making thousands of comparisons per second, they are able to determine the vehicle's location within a few centimeters.The software converts the map data into a three-dimensional picture much like a video game. The car's navigation system can then compare these synthetic pictures with the real-world pictures streaming in from a conventional video camera.SourceAlso: See more Software tech briefs.

Posted in: Cameras, Imaging, Photonics, Lasers & Laser Systems, Software, News, Automotive

Read More >>

New Serenity Payload Detects Hostile Fire

Two government-developed sensors are working together to increase the security of deployed soldiers. The Firefly and Serenity sensors employ government developed algorithms, software, and hardware to locate hostile fire around a base. The technology, a joint effort between the Army Aviation Research, Development and Engineering Center, or AMRDEC, and the Army Research Lab, referred to as ARL, has been under development for more than a decade.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Cameras, Imaging, Photonics, Optics, Sensors, Detectors, Defense, News

Read More >>

Tiny Camera Lets NASA Inspection Tool “See”

micro ScoutCam‘ 1.2 micro camera Medigus, Ltd. Omer, Israel 011 972 8646 6880 www.medigus.com NASA has incorporated the micro ScoutCam 1.2 into its Visual Inspection Poseable Invertebrate Robot (VIPIR) tool. VIPIR is a robotic, maneuverable, borescope inspection tool being tested as part of the Robotic Refueling Mission, an experiment on the International Space Station that has been demonstrating tools, technologies, and techniques for on-orbit satellite servicing since 2011.

Posted in: Cameras, Imaging, Robotics, Articles, Application Briefs

Read More >>

Head-Worn Display Concepts for Ground Operations for Commercial Aircraft

This display enables a higher level of safety during ground operations, including taxiway navigation and situational awareness. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia The Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck (IIFD) project, part of NASA’s Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), comprises a multi-disciplinary research effort to develop flight deck technologies that mitigate operator-, automation-, and environment-induced hazards. Toward this objective, the IIFD project is developing crew/vehicle interface technologies that reduce the propensity for pilot error, minimize the risks associated with pilot error, and proactively overcome aircraft safety barriers that would otherwise constrain the next full realization of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Part of this research effort involves the use of synthetic and enhanced vision systems and advanced display media as enabling crew-vehicle interface technologies to meet these safety challenges.

Posted in: Imaging, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Aviation, Articles, Briefs, TSP, Aeronautics

Read More >>

Flight Imagery Recorder Locator (FIRLo) and High-Temperature Radome

This technology is applicable to the commercial airline industry for locating “black boxes.” NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California LDSD (Low Density Supersonic Decelerator) is a Mars EDL (entry, descent, and landing) Technology Development Project that launches three test vehicles out of the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai. On the test vehicle, most mission science data can be recorded safely on land; however, high-speed and high-resolution imagery cannot be telemetered due to bandwidth constraints. Therefore, all information had to be recorded solely onboard the test vehicle; this unit is called the flight imagery recorder (FIR). A typical commercial airliner “black box” is only capable of recording on the order of gigabytes of data, whereas this work required on the order of terabytes (a few orders of magnitude larger).

Posted in: Imaging, Communications, Articles, Briefs

Read More >>

Product of the Month: LED Light Engines for Large FOV Fluorescence Imaging Systems

Innovations in Optics, Inc. (Woburn, MA) offers high power LED Light Engines as excitation illuminators for large field-of-view fluorescent imagers used in life science instruments. LumiBright LE Light Engines feature patented non-imaging optics that direct LED light into a desired cone angle, while producing highly uniform output, both angularly and spatially. The two standard far-field half-angles are 20 and 40 degrees. Available peak LED wavelengths range from 365 nm in the ultraviolet through 970 nm in the near-infrared.

Posted in: Products, Imaging, Photonics, LEDs

Read More >>

CCD Image Sensor

The KAI-08051 charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensor from ON Semiconductor (Phoenix, AZ) shares the same advanced 5.5 micron pixel architecture, 8 megapixel resolution, 15 frame per second readout rate, and 4/3 optical format as the existing KAI-08050 Image Sensor, but improves key performance parameters through the use of an improved amplifier design, newly optimized microlens structure, and new color filter pigments in both Bayer and Sparse color configurations.

Posted in: Products, Imaging, Photonics, Sensors

Read More >>

Thermal Imaging Core

FLIR Systems, Inc. (Portland, OR) has announced its latest thermal imaging core, Muon™, which is designed specifically for OEMs capable of integrating uncooled FPAs into their own camera solutions. Muon is based on FLIR’s 17μ pitch Vandium Oxide (VOx) 640x512 or 336x256 FPAs and offers frame rates of 9Hz and up to 60Hz. Optimized for size, weight and power (SWaP), Muon has a form factor of 22 mm × 22 mm × 6 mm, a mass of less than 5 grams, and depending on the configuration, uses less than 300mW of power.

Posted in: Products, Imaging, Photonics

Read More >>

Imaging Sensor Targets

Headwall (Fitchburg, MA) has announced the availability of a new hyperspectral imager targeting very high resolution spectral measurements of 0.1 nm over specific spectral ranges that yield indicators of vegetative fluorescence to measure plant health. The new sensor is based on Headwall's all-reflective concentric optical design that uses very precise, very high diffraction-efficiency gratings for simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution of < 0.1nm across the spectral range of the instrument.

Posted in: Products, Imaging, Photonics, Sensors

Read More >>

sCMOS Camera

The Andor (Belfast, UK) Neo 5.5 megapixel sCMOS camera is a unique - 40°C vacuum cooled platform designed around a low noise 5.5 megapixel sensor with 6.5 μm pixels and a 22mm diameter to drive lowest possible dark noise. Ideal for cell microscopy, astronomy, digital pathology, and high content screening, the Neo 5.5 delivers 30 fps sustained or up to 100 fps burst mode to its internal 4GB memory. The Rolling and Global shutter feature further enhances application flexibility, Global shutter in particular offering an ideal means to simply and efficiently synchronize the Neo with other 'moving' devices such as stages or light switching sources and eliminating the possibility of spatial distortion when imaging fast moving objects.

Posted in: Products, Cameras, Photonics

Read More >>

White Papers

Liquid Silicone Rubber Takes the Heat
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Finding the Right Manufacturer for Your Design
Sponsored by Sunstone Circuits
Fundamentals of Vector Network Analysis Primer
Sponsored by Rohde and Schwarz A and D
Why bigger isn’t always better: the case for thin section bearings
Sponsored by Kaydon
PICO xMOD Data Sheet
Sponsored by Nordson EFD
Envelope Tracking and Digital Pre-Distortion Test Solution for RF Amplifiers
Sponsored by Rohde and Schwarz A and D

White Papers Sponsored By: