Imaging

Sound-Off: How Do a Vehicle’s Imaging Sensors Filter Out Weather, Crosstalk?

A "Geiger-mode" lidar sensor sends out pulses at a high repetition rate (200 kHz), forming an image on the percent of pulses that return. The technology has been used by vehicle manufacturers to support collision avoidance, adaptive cruise control, and other Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) applications. But how will factors like snow or another vehicle’s lidar impact a sensor's reading?

Posted in: News, Automotive, Imaging, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors
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Are You Using Augmented Reality in the Design Process?

A new report concludes that the augmented reality (AR) market is expected to grow from $2.39 billion in 2016 to $61.39 billion by 2023.

Posted in: News, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Imaging
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World’s Brightest Laser Sparks New Behavior in Light

A rendering of how changes in an electron's motion (bottom) alter the scattering of light (top), as measured in a new experiment that scattered more than 500 photons of light from a single electron. Previous experiments had managed to scatter no more than a few photons at a time. (Credit: Donald Umstadter and Wenchao Yan)

Physicists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln are seeing an everyday phenomenon in a new light. By focusing laser light to a brightness 1 billion times greater than the surface of the sun — the brightest light ever produced on Earth — the physicists have observed changes in a vision-enabling interaction between light and matter. Those changes yielded unique X-ray pulses with the potential to generate extremely high-resolution imagery useful for medical, engineering, scientific and security purposes.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Lasers & Laser Systems
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Lindley Johnson, Planetary Defense Officer, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D. C.

NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office (PDCO), managed at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., is responsible for early detection of potentially hazardous objects, like asteroids and comets, and issuing warnings about their potential impacts. This requires teamwork from observatories around the world. NASA’s Planetary Defense Officer, Lindley Johnson leads the global effort to detect and follow near-earth objects

Posted in: Who's Who, Aerospace, Data Acquisition, Imaging
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Could lenses and thick cameras become obsolete?

A team at the California Institute of Technology designed a lens-less camera. "Once scaled up, this technology can make lenses and thick cameras obsolete," said graduate student and camera researcher Behrooz Abiri. What do you think? Could lenses and thick cameras become obsolete?

Posted in: Question of the Week, Cameras, Imaging
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Microstructural Explorations Inside Fuel Cells

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a promising technology that can efficiently produce energy using fossil fuels with no moving parts and low emissions, present a particularly perplexing economic challenge: current systems operate at maximum efficiency between 700 and 1000 degrees Celsius, but such high temperatures shorten their service life, requiring more frequent fuel cell stack replacements. Lowering the operating temperature makes them last longer, but requires additional cells in the stack to deliver the same performance, and that drives up costs.

Posted in: Briefs, Imaging, Photonics
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CMOS The Future of Image Sensor Technology

CMOS imaging is trending to become the dominant imaging technology. Initially, CMOS was limited by its inherent noise. Architectures were then essentially analog and the idea of integrating the image processing features with System On Chip (SoC) technology was yet to be considered. However, it is fundamentally this SoC characteristic of CMOS that has driven impressive growth. Over the years, this technology has become more and more competitive. The commercial race started in early 2000 when the big players applied continuous improvements to electro-optical performance.

Posted in: Articles, Imaging, Photonics
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Ruggedization of Imaging Lenses

Imaging lenses used in many industrial machine vision applications have special requirements beyond those of standard imaging lenses. The lenses used in factory automation, robotics, and industrial inspection have to work in specific and demanding environments, which could involve vibrations, shocks, temperature changes, and contaminants. Because of these environmental requirements, new classes of ruggedized lenses are being designed specifically to work in a multitude of different scenarios, therefore creating different types of ruggedization. There are three distinct types of ruggedization available: industrial ruggedization, ingress protection ruggedization, and stability ruggedization.

Posted in: Articles, Cameras, Imaging, Photonics
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The Advanced Land Imager Helped NASA Mission Exceed Expectations.

After more than 16 years of operation, NASA’s Earth Observing–1 (EO-1) spacecraft was decommissioned on March 30 of this year. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory was aboard as an alternative to the land-imaging sensor that was used by the Landsat Earth-observing program.

Posted in: Briefs, Imaging, Photonics
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New Products: July 2017 Photonics & Imaging Technology

Photoluminescence Spectrometer (PRIORITY)

Edinburgh Instruments (Kirkton Campus, UK) introduces the FLS1000 state-of-the-art, modular photoluminescence spectrometer. The instrument excels in both steady state and time-resolved spectroscopy. It can be configured for spectral measurements from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared spectral range, and for lifetime measurements spanning time resolutions over 12 orders of magnitude from picoseconds to seconds. Its ultimate sensitivity for the standard water Raman measurement is >30,000:1.

Posted in: Products, Imaging, Photonics
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