Imaging

Algorithm for Estimating PRC Wavefront Errors from Shack-Hartmann Camera Images

Phase retrieval is used for the calibration and the fine-alignment of an optical system. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Phase retrieval (PR) and Shack-Hartmann Sensor (SHS) are the two preferred methods of image-based wavefront sensing widely used in various optical testbeds, adaptive optical systems, and ground- and space-based telescopes. They are used to recover the phase information of an optical system from defocused point source images (PR) and focused point source or extended scene images (SHS). For example, the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph’s (TPF-C’s) High-Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) uses a PR camera (PRC) to estimate, and subsequently correct, the phase error at the exit pupil of this optical system. Several other test-beds at JPL were, and will be, equipped with both a PRC and a Shack-Hartmann camera (SHC).

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Cameras, Imaging, Optics, Sensors

Read More >>

New Navigation Software Cuts Self-Driving Car Costs

A new software system developed at the University of Michigan uses video game technology to help solve one of the most daunting hurdles facing self-driving and automated cars: the high cost of the laser scanners they use to determine their location.Ryan Wolcott, a U-M doctoral candidate in computer science and engineering, estimates that the new concept could shave thousands of dollars from the cost of these vehicles. The technology enables them to navigate using a single video camera, delivering the same level of accuracy as laser scanners at a fraction of the cost."The laser scanners used by most self-driving cars in development today cost tens of thousands of dollars, and I thought there must be a cheaper sensor that could do the same job," he said. "Cameras only cost a few dollars each and they're already in a lot of cars. So they were an obvious choice."Wolcott's system builds on the navigation systems used in other self-driving cars that are currently in development, including Google's vehicle. The navigation systems use three-dimensional laser scanning technology to create a real-time map of their environment, then compare that real-time map to a pre-drawn map stored in the system. By making thousands of comparisons per second, they are able to determine the vehicle's location within a few centimeters.The software converts the map data into a three-dimensional picture much like a video game. The car's navigation system can then compare these synthetic pictures with the real-world pictures streaming in from a conventional video camera.SourceAlso: See more Software tech briefs.

Posted in: News, Automotive, Cameras, Imaging, Lasers & Laser Systems, Photonics, Software

Read More >>

New Serenity Payload Detects Hostile Fire

Two government-developed sensors are working together to increase the security of deployed soldiers. The Firefly and Serenity sensors employ government developed algorithms, software, and hardware to locate hostile fire around a base. The technology, a joint effort between the Army Aviation Research, Development and Engineering Center, or AMRDEC, and the Army Research Lab, referred to as ARL, has been under development for more than a decade.

Posted in: News, Defense, Electronics & Computers, Cameras, Imaging, Optics, Photonics, Detectors, Sensors

Read More >>

Product of the Month: LED Light Engines for Large FOV Fluorescence Imaging Systems

Innovations in Optics, Inc. (Woburn, MA) offers high power LED Light Engines as excitation illuminators for large field-of-view fluorescent imagers used in life science instruments. LumiBright LE Light Engines feature patented non-imaging optics that direct LED light into a desired cone angle, while producing highly uniform output, both angularly and spatially. The two standard far-field half-angles are 20 and 40 degrees. Available peak LED wavelengths range from 365 nm in the ultraviolet through 970 nm in the near-infrared.

Posted in: Products, Products, Imaging, LEDs, Photonics

Read More >>

CCD Image Sensor

The KAI-08051 charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensor from ON Semiconductor (Phoenix, AZ) shares the same advanced 5.5 micron pixel architecture, 8 megapixel resolution, 15 frame per second readout rate, and 4/3 optical format as the existing KAI-08050 Image Sensor, but improves key performance parameters through the use of an improved amplifier design, newly optimized microlens structure, and new color filter pigments in both Bayer and Sparse color configurations.

Posted in: Products, Products, Imaging, Photonics, Sensors

Read More >>

Thermal Imaging Core

FLIR Systems, Inc. (Portland, OR) has announced its latest thermal imaging core, Muon™, which is designed specifically for OEMs capable of integrating uncooled FPAs into their own camera solutions. Muon is based on FLIR’s 17μ pitch Vandium Oxide (VOx) 640x512 or 336x256 FPAs and offers frame rates of 9Hz and up to 60Hz. Optimized for size, weight and power (SWaP), Muon has a form factor of 22 mm × 22 mm × 6 mm, a mass of less than 5 grams, and depending on the configuration, uses less than 300mW of power.

Posted in: Products, Products, Imaging, Photonics

Read More >>

Imaging Sensor Targets

Headwall (Fitchburg, MA) has announced the availability of a new hyperspectral imager targeting very high resolution spectral measurements of 0.1 nm over specific spectral ranges that yield indicators of vegetative fluorescence to measure plant health. The new sensor is based on Headwall's all-reflective concentric optical design that uses very precise, very high diffraction-efficiency gratings for simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution of < 0.1nm across the spectral range of the instrument.

Posted in: Products, Products, Imaging, Photonics, Sensors

Read More >>

sCMOS Camera

The Andor (Belfast, UK) Neo 5.5 megapixel sCMOS camera is a unique - 40°C vacuum cooled platform designed around a low noise 5.5 megapixel sensor with 6.5 μm pixels and a 22mm diameter to drive lowest possible dark noise. Ideal for cell microscopy, astronomy, digital pathology, and high content screening, the Neo 5.5 delivers 30 fps sustained or up to 100 fps burst mode to its internal 4GB memory. The Rolling and Global shutter feature further enhances application flexibility, Global shutter in particular offering an ideal means to simply and efficiently synchronize the Neo with other 'moving' devices such as stages or light switching sources and eliminating the possibility of spatial distortion when imaging fast moving objects.

Posted in: Products, Products, Cameras, Photonics

Read More >>

High-Speed Cameras

XIMEA (Munster, Germany) recently announced new Thunderbolt™ technology ready cameras that are equipped with the newest sensors from Sony (IMX174) and CMOSIS (CMV20000). The cameras provide highest speeds and direct access to computer memory at 10 and 20 Gbit/s respectively.

Posted in: Products, Products, Cameras, Photonics

Read More >>

Tiny Camera Lets NASA Inspection Tool “See”

micro ScoutCam‘ 1.2 micro camera Medigus, Ltd. Omer, Israel 011 972 8646 6880 www.medigus.com NASA has incorporated the micro ScoutCam 1.2 into its Visual Inspection Poseable Invertebrate Robot (VIPIR) tool. VIPIR is a robotic, maneuverable, borescope inspection tool being tested as part of the Robotic Refueling Mission, an experiment on the International Space Station that has been demonstrating tools, technologies, and techniques for on-orbit satellite servicing since 2011.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Articles, Cameras, Imaging, Robotics

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.