Lighting

Researchers Craft New Material That Could Improve LED Screens

Researchers working at the Ultrafast Laser Lab at the University of Kansas successfully created a new bilayer material, with each layer measuring less than one nanometer in thickness. The new material, that someday could lead to more efficient and versatile light emission, was made by combining atomically thin layers of molybdenum disulfide and rhenium disulfide.

Posted in: News, ptb catchall, LEDs, Powering & Controlling LEDs, Materials, Optical Components, Optics, Photonics
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Public Lighting System Runs on Solar and Wind Energy

A researcher at the Barcelona College of Industrial Engineering, in collaboration with the company Eolgreen, has developed the first autonomous industrialized public lighting system that works with solar and wind energy. This system, developed after four years of research, is designed for inter-urban roads, motorways, urban parks, and other public areas. It is unique in the world, and reduces the cost by 20% compared with conventional public lighting systems.

The prototype is 10 meters high and is fitted with a solar panel, a wind turbine, and a battery. The turbine runs at a speed of 10 to 200 rpm and has a maximum output of 400 watts. Work is being done on a second prototype generator that runs at a lower speed (10 to 60 rpm) and has a lower output (100 W). An electronic control system manages the flow of energy among the solar panel, the wind turbine, the battery, and the light.

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Posted in: News, Batteries, Electronics & Computers, Energy, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, Wind Power, Lighting
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New Compounds Developed to Manufacture Tunable OLED Devices

Researchers have developed new organic compounds characterized by higher modularity, stability, and efficiency that could be applicable for use in electronics or lighting. A proof-of-concept project has begun to verify that the compounds have the photoluminescence and electrochemical properties required for the manufacture of tunable organic LEDs (OLEDs) that can emit in the blue portion of the visible spectrum, thus applying lower voltages and achieving greater efficiency and longer life.

Posted in: News, Electronics & Computers, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Lighting, OLEDs, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials
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Researchers Solve the Mystery of Efficiency Droop in LEDs

UC Santa Barbara

The ordinary light bulb is an innovation so extraordinary that a sudden brilliant idea is called “a light bulb moment.” Credit for inventing the first incandescent-style light bulb often goes to Thomas Edison, but even that wasn’t a light bulb moment. In fact, his patent for an improved electric light came after 75 years of hard work by several scientists and engineers, all scrambling to find the best way to run an electrical current through a filament and get it to glow.

Posted in: News, LEDs, Lighting
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Pyramid Scheme for Brighter Organic LEDs Could Produce Better Light Bulbs

University of Michigan

The most common kind of light bulb in the United States— the incandescent—is only about 5 percent efficient. The phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode, on the other hand, makes light out of 100 percent of the electricity that goes into it. They're good for smartphone screens and mood lighting, but they drop off in both efficiency and lifetime when they have to shine brightly. University of Michigan researchers have found an elegant way to get around this problem, however, by arranging the PHOLEDs into a pyramid.

Posted in: News, LEDs, Lighting
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Researchers Equip Robot with Novel Tactile Sensor

Researchers at MIT and Northeastern University have equipped a robot with a novel tactile sensor that lets it grasp a USB cable draped freely over a hook and insert it into a USB port.The sensor is an adaptation of a technology called GelSight, which was developed by the lab of Edward Adelson, the John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Vision Science at MIT, and first described in 2009. The new sensor isn’t as sensitive as the original GelSight sensor, which could resolve details on the micrometer scale. But it’s smaller — small enough to fit on a robot’s gripper — and its processing algorithm is faster, so it can give the robot feedback in real time.A GelSight sensor — both the original and the new, robot-mounted version — consists of a slab of transparent, synthetic rubber coated on one side with a metallic paint. The rubber conforms to any object it’s pressed against, and the metallic paint evens out the light-reflective properties of diverse materials, making it much easier to make precise optical measurements.In the new device, the gel is mounted in a cubic plastic housing, with just the paint-covered face exposed. The four walls of the cube adjacent to the sensor face are translucent, and each conducts a different color of light — red, green, blue, or white — emitted by light-emitting diodes at the opposite end of the cube. When the gel is deformed, light bounces off of the metallic paint and is captured by a camera mounted on the same cube face as the diodes.From the different intensities of the different-colored light, the algorithms developed by Adelson’s team can infer the three-dimensional structure of ridges or depressions of the surface against which the sensor is pressed.

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Posted in: News, LEDs, Lighting, Materials, Motion Control, Optics, Photonics, Automation, Robotics, Sensors
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Light-Emitting Properties of Quantum Dots Can Help Harvest Sunlight

Los Alamos National Laboratory

A house window that doubles as a solar panel could be on the horizon, thanks to recent quantum-dot work by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers in collaboration with scientists from University of Milano-Bicocca (UNIMIB), Italy. Their project demonstrates that the superior light-emitting properties of quantum dots can be applied in solar energy by helping more efficiently harvest sunlight.

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NIST Studies Why Quantum Dots Suffer from ‘Fluorescence Intermittency’

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), working in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory, have found that a particular species of quantum dots that weren't commonly thought to blink, do. Although the blinks are short — on the order of nanoseconds to milliseconds — even brief fluctuations can result in efficiency losses that could cause trouble for using quantum dots to generate photons that move information around inside a quantum computer or between nodes of a future high-security internet based on quantum telecommunications.

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Novel Nanoparticle Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses, Solar Cells

Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia National Laboratories has come up with an inexpensive way to synthesize titanium-dioxide nanoparticles and is seeking partners who can demonstrate the process at industrial scale for everything from solar cells to light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

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Researchers Determine LEDs Are Safe for Skin

Stony Brook University

There was a time when no one thought about light bulbs; when one blew, you simply screwed in another one. Nowadays, it’s more complicated, as energy efficiency concerns have given rise to a slew of options, including incandescent, compact fluorescent lights, and light emitting diodes.

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