Lighting

Researchers Develop Flexible, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Circuit

Researchers from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have developed a flexible, energy-efficient hybrid circuit combining carbon nanotube thin film transistors with other thin film transistors. The hybrid could take the place of silicon as the traditional transistor material used in electronic chips, since carbon nanotubes are more transparent, flexible, and can be processed at a lower cost.The hybridization of carbon nanotube thin films and IGZO (indium, gallium and zinc oxide) thin films was achieved by combining their types, p-type and n-type, respectively, to create circuits that can operate complimentarily, reducing power loss and increasing efficiency. The inclusion of IGZO thin film transistors provided power efficiency to increase battery life. The potential applications for the integrated circuitry are numerous, including Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs), digital circuits, radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, sensors, wearable electronics, and flash memory devices. Even heads-up displays on vehicle dashboards could soon be a reality.The new technology also has major medical implications. Currently, memory used in computers and phones is made with silicon substrates, the surface on which memory chips are built. To obtain medical information from a patient such as heart rate or brainwave data, stiff electrode objects are placed on several fixed locations on the patient’s body. With the new hybridized circuit, however, electrodes could be placed all over the patient’s body with just a single large but flexible object.SourceAlso: Learn about an Integral Battery Power Limiting Circuit for Intrinsically Safe Applications.

Posted in: News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics & Computers, Lighting, OLEDs, Medical, Patient Monitoring, RF & Microwave Electronics, Semiconductors & ICs, Sensors
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Liquid Cooling Technology for LEDs

By David Horn, SWITCH Lighting Co., San Jose, CA

Best quality LED A-lamp light bulbs provide a superior, energy-efficient alternative to incandescent bulbs, which have essentially been banned as of January 1, 2014. LED bulbs offer the same amount of light as an incandescent while using up to 80 % less energy. There still remains, however, a wide discrepancy in performance between LED bulbs and what consumers expect from them as alternatives to standard incandescent bulbs. This variation in performance and cost can be largely attributed to how specific LED bulb manufacturers solve the challenge of removing heat from the LED components within their bulbs.

Posted in: Articles, Lighting
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Finding the Optimal Lighting Solution for Line-Scan Applications

By Michael Geiser and Martin Hund, Chromasens, Konstanz, Germany

In machine vision systems, acquiring images of moving targets is a challenge and consequently the best image requires three fundamentals to be well defined:

an excellent camera; an appropriate lens; an appropriate illumination.

All three items are the key to enable subsequent successful image analysis, while poor image quality will task any machine vision application.

Posted in: Articles, Lighting
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LED Street Lights Reduce Energy Consumption by 72% at Power Station

When the NRG power plant in El Segundo, Calif., was redesigned, two towers were demolished which caused extensive light from the plant to bother local neighbors. In an effort to get rid of this light pollution and update old lighting fixtures at the same time, NRG turned to LEDtronics, Inc. for assistance.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Lighting
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Production Company Uses LED Street Lights To Illuminate Dark Parking Lot

Solar Energy Technologies, Inc., Hialeah, FL MaxLite, West Caldwell, NJ

Imagina US is a pioneer production company in the U.S. Hispanic TV industry that has a newly built headquarters in Miami, Florida. Owners were seeking low-wattage outdoor lighting for the facility’s parking lots. At first, the owners were looking at 400-watt metal halide fixtures, however, they wanted to consider lower wattage and better quality LED lighting fixtures.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Lighting
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Customized Goniophotometer System Tests High Intensity Obstruction Lights

Hughey & Phillips (H&P), Urbana, OH

Hughey & Phillips (H&P) designs and manufactures flashing and steady state anti-collision lighting used on above-ground obstructions like communication towers, antennas, buildings, wind turbines, grain elevators, smoke stacks, bridges and other man-made structures that are potential collision hazards for aircraft. Used as either standalone fixtures or as part of integrated systems, these low, medium, and high intensity lighting devices illuminate obstructions to aerial navigation as specified by the FAA, FCC, ICAO, DGAC of Mexico and Transport Canada. The required light output intensity of H&P’s products increases with altitude - the higher the elevation, the greater the required output intensity.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Lighting
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First Single-Molecule LED Developed

Breakthrough could be the first step towards making molecule-sized components that combine electrical and optical properties.

Institut de Physique et de Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France

The ultimate challenge in the race to miniaturize light emitting diodes (LED) has finally been met. A team led by the Institut de Physique et de Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg (IPCMS, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg), in collaboration with UPMC and CEA, has developed the first-ever single-molecule LED.

Posted in: Briefs, Lighting
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Two-Dimensional Material Shows Promise for Optoelectronics

Team creates LEDs, photovoltaic cells, and light detectors using novel one-molecule-thick material.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Ateam of MIT researchers has used a novel material that’s just a few atoms thick to create devices that can harness or emit light. This proof-of-concept could lead to ultra-thin, lightweight, and flexible photovoltaic cells, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and other optoelectronic devices.

Posted in: Briefs, Lighting
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Improving the Efficiency of Green-Blue-Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diodes

New approach could lead to the creation of low threshold lasers and high power light emitting diodes (LEDs).

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have suggested a method that could significantly increase the efficiency of green-blue-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes based on GaInN/GaN, AlGaN/GaN, and AlInN/GaN quantum wells. Their approach could enable advances in solid state lighting and the creation of low threshold lasers and high power light emitting diodes (LEDs).

Posted in: Briefs, Lighting
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Scientists Build Thinnest-Possible LEDs To Be Stronger, More Energy Efficient

University of Washington

Most modern electronics, from flat-screen TVs and smartphones to wearable technologies and computer monitors, use tiny light-emitting diodes, or LEDs. These LEDs are based on semiconductors that emit light with the movement of electrons. As devices get smaller and faster, there is more demand for semiconductors that are tinier, stronger and more energy efficient.

Posted in: News, Lighting
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