Manufacturing & Prototyping

Survival of the fittest - the process control imperative

In tough times, manufacturers focus on reducing their operating costs, but may not be able to afford to spend their way out by buying more productive machinery. With that pathway closed, what are the opportunities for radically reducing costs without replacing existing machines? Where can we:

Posted in: White Papers, Machinery & Automation, Robotics

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Increasing Tier 4 Efficiencies via Systems Integration

In conjuction with SAE With a victory over Tier 4 emissions regulations achieved across the off-highway industry, engines manufacturers, OEMs, and other system suppliers now must find other ways to differentiate themselves and gain competitive advantages over rivals. The main way to do that is to collaborate on increasing system efficiencies along the entire lifecycle of a vehicle and its components via optimum systems integration.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

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Traceability Best Practices for Systems Engineers

Serious situations: In the middle of a project, your best customer changes a high-level business requirement. How will this change impact the system spec your engineers are working on right now? How will it impact scope for the upcoming release?

Posted in: White Papers, Electronics

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Method for Decreasing Additive Manufacturing Build Times Using Arrays of Multiple Deposition Heads

3D printing several parts simultaneously enables increased speed for mass production. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Additive manufacturing (AM, also informally known as 3D printing) is a relatively new process for fabricating net- shaped parts from a computer-generated drawing. The inherent problem with using AM in mass production is the slow build times for each part. Because parts must be built layer by layer, the build time cannot be dramatically increased. The build time is limited by the physical melting and consolidation of plastic or metal, which cannot be dramatically speeded up, and the velocity of the build head, which is limited by the mechanical motion mechanism. One solution to the inherently slow build times is to replicate the building head, while replicating as few of the other machine components as possible. Utilizing this technique, the fabrication time per part can be reduced by the number of simultaneous building heads, which may make the AM process suitable for some mass production.

Posted in: Briefs

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Electropolishing in Pneumatics and Hydraulics

This single-process finishing method can be employed for virtually any metal alloy. Able Electropolishing, Chicago, Illinois Manufacturing reliable, high-performing parts and components that have extended lifecycles is crucial for the pneumatics and hydraulics industry. From springs to fittings, the performance of each these manufactured parts and components is essential to the operation of machinery used in a variety of disciplines in the pneumatics and hydraulics industry. When reliability, functionality, performance, and life of metal parts are paramount, electropolishing is a single-process metal finishing method that effectively meets the challenges.

Posted in: Briefs

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Reusable Integrated Instrument Control and Computing Platform

This reusable hardware/software platform has applications in embedded systems and digital signal processing applications in small spacecraft, airborne avionics, and instrument electronics. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California ISAAC (Instrument Shared Artifact for Computing) offers adaptability, computation power, I/O bandwidth, digital interface standards, and data processing capability in a single, common, low-mass/power, and small-form-factor platform with significantly reduced, nonrecurring cost and risk to Earth Science instruments such as SMAP/HYDROS and other NASA/JPL planetary exploration instruments with diverse requirements. This platform has six key components:

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Products of Tomorrow: October 2015

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Articles, Products

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