Manufacturing & Prototyping

Virtual Prototyping: Visualizing the Next Generation of Products

The Department of Defense defines a virtual prototype as “A computer-based simulation of a system or subsystem with a degree of functional realism comparable to a physical prototype.” A virtual prototype is built from CAD drawings of separate assemblies that are gradually placed into the whole. Since the drawings of each subassembly are detailed and accurate, you can accurately assess their form (overall shape), fit (ease of as- sembly), and function (making sure it performs as specified). In addition to these traditional three Fs, the virtual prototype can be used for motion studies and studying interactions be- tween the machine and the humans who will use it. Once the design is complete, you can use the digital model to see whether parts interfere as you move them through their com- plete range of motion. In the past, design and analysis have been separate tasks, performed by different teams. With virtual prototyping, these functions are completely entwined.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, White Papers

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3D Printing and the Future of Manufacturing

3D printing is transforming the manufacturing industry in big ways. From realized design freedom to supply chain efficiencies, 3D printing is contributing largely to the recent upswing in reshoring manufacturing in North America. Read the latest white paper from Stratasys Service Bureaus to learn how 3D printing will continue to transform the industry in the coming years.

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Meeting Industry Standards for Sanitation in The Food Industry

Food service equipment manufacturing and electropolishing go hand in hand. Parts said to be made of “Food Grade Stainless” typically have undergone finishing operations such as passivation or electropolishing to enhance the cleanliness and corrosion resistance. With electropolishing, you also receive the added benefits of microfinish improvement and deburring.

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Multi-Step DRIE Process to Fabricate Silicon-Based THz Components

Commercial applications include airport screening systems, explosives detectors, nondestructive testing, and wireless communications. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Terahertz (THz) frequency radiometers, spectrometers, and radars are promising instruments for the remote sensing of planetary atmospheres such as Mars, Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn, and their moons such as Titan, Europa, Ganymede, and others. For these long-term planetary missions, severe constraints are put on the mass and power budget for the payload instruments.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

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Flexible, Lightweight Vacuum Shell for Load-Responsive Multilayer Insulation for High Thermal Performance

There are substantial reductions in weight and improvements in performance. Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland Better thermal insulation is needed to insulate cryogenic propellants used by NASA for launch vehicles, spacecraft, and orbiting fuel depots. In particular, cryotank insulation during in-air pre-launch and launch ascent stages currently uses spray-on foam insulation (SOFI), which is extremely problematic.

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3D Printing in Space: The Next Frontier

NASA has a long-term strategy for In-Space Manufacturing that includes fabricating components and equipment on demand for human missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. To support this strategy, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Made In Space, Inc. have developed the 3D Printing In Zero-G Technology Demonstration for the International Space Station (ISS). The experiment will be the first machine ever to perform 3D printing in space.

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Integrally Woven Fiber Architecture for Composite Turbine Blades

John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio Composite turbine blades are currently fabricated by laying up multiple layers of fibers in the form of either unidirectional prepregs or thin woven cloth. Composites formed in this manner have poor through-thickness strength. It is also difficult, if not impossible, to form trailing edges as thin as necessary for optimum engine performance.

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