Manufacturing & Prototyping

Making Flexible Ablators that are Flexible Char Formers

Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California An approach was developed for making low-density, flexible ablators for a thermal protection system (TPS) from a flexible fibrous carbon substrate and a polymer resin. The material is foldable and stowable, and can be deployed in space without compromising performance. In addition, the material can be stowed in space for very long periods of time (years) without compromising deployability or performance. These flexible ablators offer an alternative to rigid TPS materials, thereby reducing design complexity and cost. On charring, the flexible ablative TPS retains its flexibility. After charring, the TPS has comparable flexibility and mechanical properties to the virgin material.

Posted in: Briefs

Read More >>

Method for Providing Semiconductors Having Self-Aligned Ion Implant

Refined self-aligned ion implantation for improved SiC high-temperature transistors. John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio This is a modification to technology for realizing durable and stable electrical functionality of high-temperature transistors. This modification is believed crucial to experimental implementation of SiC junction field effect transistors that electrically operated continuously at 500 °C for over 10,000 hours in an air ambient with less than 10% change in operational transistor parameters.

Posted in: Briefs

Read More >>

Femtosecond Laser Processing of Metal and Plastics

Precision machining can be achieved with no thermal affects and minimal post-processing. Amada Miyachi America, Monrovia, California and Jenoptik, Jena, Germany While precise and fast, the down side to cutting with microsecond (ms) fiber lasers has been that the parts require a number of post-processing operations after they are cut, which add significantly to part cost, and can also damage mechanically delicate parts.

Posted in: Briefs

Read More >>

Increased Alignment in Carbon Nanotube Growth

Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California The combination of electronic and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to wide-ranging investigation of their potential in future electronics and computing, sensors, electrodes, and composites. A method and system for fabricating an array of two or more CNT structures on a coated substrate surface was developed.

Posted in: Briefs

Read More >>

Process to Fabricate Specific Sized Monodisperse Polystyrene Microparticles

Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia A new method was developed to prepare monodisperse nano to microparticles of polystyrene ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 microns in relatively large-quantity batches (2 L, 10% by weight in water). Current commercial sources are very expensive and can typically only be acquired on a relatively small scale. Monodisperse polystyrene in this size range is an important component of laser velocimetry measurements in wind tunnels, but has many other potential uses. Polystyrene microparticles have uses in paints/coatings, adhesives, bio/immunoassays, reaction catalysts, and chromatography materials. The main benefits of this technology are low cost, scalability, and selectable size.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

Read More >>

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Based Fabrication of Printable Electronics and Functional Coatings

Applications include biomedical, consumer electronics, security, and communications industries. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California The need for low-cost and environmentally friendly processes for fabricating printable electronics and biosensor chips is growing. Nanomaterials have proved to be very useful in both printable electronics due to their electronic properties, and in biosensors for signal transduction, and amplification. Chemical vapor deposition requires high temperatures for the growth of nanostructures, restricting the type and nature of materials that can be used as substrates. Conventional plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition requires high vacuum equipment, and the need for vacuum results in additional costs of vacuum pumps and energy resources.

Posted in: Briefs

Read More >>

Passive Destructive Interference Acoustic Liner for a Turbofan Engine Using Additive Manufacturing

John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio This technology exploits the capabilities of additive manufacturing to attenuate the fan noise within the inlet or aft duct of a turbofan engine. The approach may be expanded to include auxiliary power units, environmental control systems, or other cooling systems requiring noise attenuation.

Posted in: Briefs

Read More >>

White Papers

Unique Method for Orifice Production
Sponsored by Bird Precision
The Less is More Approach to Robotic Cable Management
Sponsored by igus
Remediation and Prevention of Moisture in Electronics
Sponsored by multisorb technologies
Introduction into Theory of Direction Finding
Sponsored by rohde and schwarz a and d
Molds for Medical Technology
Sponsored by husky
How to Turn Your Engineers Into Product Design Superheroes
Sponsored by arena solutions

White Papers Sponsored By: