Manufacturing & Prototyping

Designing for the DMLS Process

Direct Metal Laser Sintering is an emerging additive manufacturing technology that has great potential to change the way parts are manufactured.

Posted in: Tech Talks

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Aluminum Rocket Engine Injector Fabricated Using 3D Additive Manufacturing

Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama Liquid rocket engine injectors can be extremely expensive to manufacture and hard to iterate to achieve high performance. Internal sealing points can also be the source of reliability issues. The technology disclosed here covers the application of a 3D additive manufacturing (AM) process to produce a functional aluminum injector for liquid propellant rocket engines, along with injector and overall engine design features that optimize the application of such processes to improve performance, reliability, and affordability relative to components produced using standard machining processes and designs. Aluminum was used for the injector instead of higher- temperature metals like stainless steel because its thermal conductance properties provide more opportunity to leverage the cooling potential of liquid oxygen and other cryogenic propellants.

Posted in: Briefs

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Making Flexible Ablators that are Flexible Char Formers

Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California An approach was developed for making low-density, flexible ablators for a thermal protection system (TPS) from a flexible fibrous carbon substrate and a polymer resin. The material is foldable and stowable, and can be deployed in space without compromising performance. In addition, the material can be stowed in space for very long periods of time (years) without compromising deployability or performance. These flexible ablators offer an alternative to rigid TPS materials, thereby reducing design complexity and cost. On charring, the flexible ablative TPS retains its flexibility. After charring, the TPS has comparable flexibility and mechanical properties to the virgin material.

Posted in: Briefs

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Method for Providing Semiconductors Having Self-Aligned Ion Implant

Refined self-aligned ion implantation for improved SiC high-temperature transistors. John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio This is a modification to technology for realizing durable and stable electrical functionality of high-temperature transistors. This modification is believed crucial to experimental implementation of SiC junction field effect transistors that electrically operated continuously at 500 °C for over 10,000 hours in an air ambient with less than 10% change in operational transistor parameters.

Posted in: Briefs

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Femtosecond Laser Processing of Metal and Plastics

Precision machining can be achieved with no thermal affects and minimal post-processing. Amada Miyachi America, Monrovia, California and Jenoptik, Jena, Germany While precise and fast, the down side to cutting with microsecond (ms) fiber lasers has been that the parts require a number of post-processing operations after they are cut, which add significantly to part cost, and can also damage mechanically delicate parts.

Posted in: Briefs

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Products of Tomorrow: June 2015

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Articles, Products

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Explosion-Proof Encoder

BEI Sensors (Goleta, CA) announced the Model LP35 explosion-proof and flameproof, low-profile, hollow shaft encoder that features a 2.01" profile and is designed to meet UL, ATEX, and IECEx standards for operation directly in Division 1, Zone 1 environments such as oil and gas. The encoder features a standard removable terminal box, and eliminates the need for an additional intrinsic safety barrier. It is designed for oil and gas applications such as top drives, which have little space to install speed-sensing devices like encoders. The vibration-resistant encoder is built to withstand up to 250G for operation in harsh drilling applications, and operates in temperatures up to 85 °C (185 °F). The encoder’s terminal box configuration allows the unit to be pre-wired. For Free Info Visit http://info.hotims.com/55590-317

Posted in: Products

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