Manufacturing & Prototyping

Novel Chemistry for Deposition of MgF2 Thin Films

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Magnesium fluoride (MgF2) thin films are useful for many different optics applications. In particular, they are useful for ultraviolet anti-reflective and protective coatings. However, in the far UV, one needs a very small, controllable amount of material to get the best optical performance. That is difficult to achieve with conventional methods. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an ideal UV-compatible thin-film deposition technique due to its ability to deposit uniform, pin-hole free films with angstrom-level thickness control. Therefore, it is an ideal technique to use to deposit protective thin films in the 2-nm thickness range. However, conventional ALD-MgF2 reactions are very unpredictable due to the low reactivity and volatility of the precursors.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

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Recruit Or Retain Report

In our recent Perfect Fit Survey, Aerotek found that the majority of hiring managers are happy with their last hire and many remain optimistic about finding the right candidate. However, results published in the January 2013 issue of The Quarterly Journal of Economics showed the average time to fill a position rose to 23 days in December 2012 compared to a low of 15.4 days in July 2009. The rhetoric of a historic skills gap has painted a negative picture of job seekers, but is there more to the story?

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, White Papers

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Researchers Use Sun to Produce Solar-Energy Materials

In a recent advance in solar energy, researchers have discovered a way to tap the sun not only as a source of power, but also to directly produce solar energy materials.This breakthrough by chemical engineers at Oregon State University could soon reduce the cost of solar energy, speed production processes, use environmentally benign materials, and make the sun a “one-stop shop” that produces both the materials for solar devices and the energy to power them.The work is based on the use of a “continuous flow” microreactor to produce nanoparticle inks that make solar cells by printing. In this process, simulated sunlight is focused on the solar microreactor to rapidly heat it, while allowing precise control of temperature to aid the quality of the finished product. The light in these experiments was produced artificially, but the process could be done with direct sunlight, and at a fraction of the cost of current approaches.SourceAlso: Read other Materials tech briefs.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials, Solar Power, Renewable Energy, Energy, Nanotechnology, News

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Wireless Device Senses Chemical Vapors

A research team at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) has developed a small electronic sensing device that can alert users wirelessly to the presence of chemical vapors in the atmosphere. The technology, which could be manufactured using familiar aerosol-jet printing techniques, is aimed at myriad applications in military, commercial, environmental, and healthcare areas.The current design integrates nanotechnology and radio-frequency identification (RFID) capabilities into a small working prototype. An array of sensors uses carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials to detect specific chemicals, while an RFID integrated circuit informs users about the presence and concentrations of those vapors at a safe distance wirelessly.Because it is based on programmable digital technology, the RFID component can provide greater security, reliability and range – and much smaller size – than earlier sensor designs based on non-programmable analog technology. The present GTRI prototype is 10 centimeters square, but further designs are expected to squeeze a multiple-sensor array and an RFID chip into a one-millimeter-square device printable on paper or on flexible, durable substrates such as liquid crystal polymer.SourceAlso: Learn about Extended-Range Passive RFID and Sensor Tags.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Environmental Monitoring, Green Design & Manufacturing, Sensors, Detectors, Medical, Communications, Wireless, RF & Microwave Electronics, Semiconductors & ICs, Nanotechnology, Defense, News

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Self-Aligning Lug for Adapting Carbon Fiber Rods to a Bolted Metallic Connection

Joint strength is controlled through precise bond line control. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California The enormous strength of unidirectional carbon fiber composite rods is difficult to take advantage of at their ends because of inadequate joining technology. Bolting does not work with unidirectional composites, and bonding is difficult due to stiffness mismatches between the metallic and composite connections. Ideally, a thick bond is desired so that the relatively softer adhesive can shear and distribute shear stresses instead of peaking at the ends of the bond. Thick bonds are difficult to obtain and repeatedly control with conventional methods of beads, bonding wire, shim, or tooling. Most of these methods control the minimum thickness of the bond, but do not control the maximum thickness. In addition, traditional joint types such as lap, strap, and scarf are not ideal for this application.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

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Growth Method for Chalcongenide Phase-Change Nanostructures

Nanometer-scale materials can provide smaller devices than those currently available. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California Recently, one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes have become the focal point of research in nanotechnology due to their fascinating properties. These properties are intrinsically associated with low dimensionality and small diameters, which may lead to unique applications in various nanoscale devices. It is generally accepted that 1-D nanostructures provide an excellent test ground for understanding the dependence of physical, electrical, thermal, optical, and mechanical properties on material dimensionality and physical size. In particular, 1-D semiconductor nanostructures, which exhibit different properties as compared with their bulk or thin film counterparts, have shown great potential in future nanoelectronics applications in data storage, computing, and sensing devices.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

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Integrated PEMFC Flow Field Design for Gravity-Independent Passive Water Removal

The design solves safety as well as reliability issues. A gravity-independent PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell stack has been developed that will operate at high-pressure H2 and O2 conditions with the requirement for relatively modest H2 and O2 gas circulation. Until now, in order to get higher efficiency, excess reactant gas flow was required to prevent water slug formation in gas channels, thus reducing fuel cell performance. In addition, this excess gas flow is typically supported by mechanical pumps and/or a high-pressure ejector system. All of these in a closed space environment contributed to potential safety as well as reliability issues due to the potential failure of mechanical pumps and ejectors.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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